Tag: Bombings

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Sports

Jason Collins came out; NBA should let him play

In this photo provided by ABC, NBA basketball veteran Jason Collins, left, poses for a photo with television journalist George Stephanopoulos, Monday, April 29, 2013, in Los Angeles. (AP Photo/ABC, Eric McCandless) by Jeff Pearlman (CNN) — It was merely a dream, wasn’t it? That whole Jason Collins thing of six months ago — never happened, right? The headline news of his becoming the first openly gay active male professional athlete in a team sport. The Sports Illustrated cover. The supportive tweets from everyone ranging from Barack Obama and Bill Clinton to Jason Kidd and LeBron James. The interviews. The raves (“Game-changing!”). The altered landscape.

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Entertainment

Phylicia Rashad takes on directing role

In this May 2, 2002, file photo, Phylicia Rashad, left, and Keshia Knight Pulliam from the “Cosby Show” arrive at NBC’s 75th anniversary celebration at New York’s Rockefeller Center. (AP Photo/Tina Fineberg, File) by Stacey Anderson WASHINGTON (AP) — Phylicia Rashad is best known for starring roles on stage and television, but as a director she’ll commemorate a historic moment that helped spur the civil rights movement.

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National

Alabama church marks 50th anniversary of bombing

Rev. Julius Scruggs, second from left, leads people in prayer during a wreath laying ceremony at the 16th Street Baptist Church in Birmingham, Ala., Sunday, Sept. 15, 2013. Rev. Jesse Jackson is fourth from left. U.S. Rep. Terri Sewell, D-Ala., is at left. (AP Photo/Hal Yeager) by Jay ReevesAssociated Press Writer BIRMINGHAM, Ala. (AP) — Hundreds of people Black and White, many holding hands, filled an Alabama church that was bombed by the Ku Klux Klan 50 years ago Sunday to mark the anniversary of the blast that killed four little girls and became a landmark moment in the civil rights struggle.

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National

Lone Klansman survives Birmingham church bombing cases

In this May 1, 2001 file photo, Jefferson County Sheriff’s Deputies lead Thomas Blanton Jr., out of the courtroom in handcuffs after a jury convicted him of murder in Birmingham, Ala. (AP Photo/Dave Martin, File) by Jat ReevesAssociated Press Writer BIRMINGHAM, Ala. (AP) — The last surviving Klansman convicted in a church bombing that killed four Black girls 50 years ago spends nearly all his time in a one-person prison cell, apparently too wary of other inmates to venture out.