Tag:  Birmingham

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National

Lone Klansman survives Birmingham church bombing cases

In this May 1, 2001 file photo, Jefferson County Sheriff’s Deputies lead Thomas Blanton Jr., out of the courtroom in handcuffs after a jury convicted him of murder in Birmingham, Ala. (AP Photo/Dave Martin, File) by Jat ReevesAssociated Press Writer BIRMINGHAM, Ala. (AP) — The last surviving Klansman convicted in a church bombing that killed four Black girls 50 years ago spends nearly all his time in a one-person prison cell, apparently too wary of other inmates to venture out.

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National

JFK to nation: ‘This nation will not be fully free, until all its citizens are free’

JOHN F.KENNEDY by Alicia W. Stewart (CNN) — Fifty years ago, Alabama Gov. George Wallace defiantly stood in front of the University of Alabama’s Foster Auditorium to prevent Black students from enrolling. The then newly elected governor had famously declared “segregation now, segregation tomorrow, segregation forever” in his inauguration speech. His “stand in the schoolhouse door” brought him national attention. It took the National Guard, federal marshals and an attorney general to persuade the governor to allow Vivian Malone Jones and James Hood to enter. It was not the first time Americans saw the drama of the civil rights movement unfold before their eyes. Earlier that spring, images of police attacking peaceful civil rights demonstrators with dogs and fire hoses in Birmingham, Alabama, flashed across the evening news. The previous year, riots were quelled with federal troops after the admission of James Meredith, the first black student at the University of Mississippi. Wallace later rescinded his views, but the incidents of the time prompted President John F. Kennedy to address the nation in a historic televised address about civil rights. “Now the time has come for this nation to fulfill its promise,” President Kennedy said in that address. ‘The events in Birmingham and elsewhere have so increased the cries for equality that no city or state or legislative body can prudently choose to ignore them.” He told the nation that evening:

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National

How MLK became an angry Black man

FREE AT LAST–Martin Luther King and Ralph Abernathy (background) leave Birmingham City Jail following their release on April 20, 1963, after eight days of imprisonment. (AP Photo) by John Blake (CNN) — By the time Clarence Jones reached him, the Rev. Martin Luther King Jr. was in bad shape.

National

Video: RNC finance chair blasts Detroit voters

DETROIT (AP) — The finance chair for the Republican National Committee told a Michigan tea party gathering this summer that Detroit’s plummeting population and lack of a mayoral machine to get voters “to stop playing pool and drinking beer in the pool hall” has decreased its influence in elections. Ronald Weiser, Republican National Committee Ron Weiser’s comments were secretly videotaped Aug. 9 by a Democrat shadowing a Republican congressional candidate. The Detroit Free Press obtained the video from the Michigan Democratic Party and reported (http://on.freep.com/ZaRArP) on it Sunday.