A pledge to keep to our youth

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(NNPA)—As young people graduate from high school, or finish the school year as sophomores and juniors, they begin to search for summer jobs. For the past several summers, the jobs have not been there, and this summer will be no different. It is true that economists are projecting a better employment situation for the college graduates who are entering the labor market now. At the same time, those high school graduates who must save money for college incidentals or for other needs will have a hard time finding work.

The Brookings Institute says that in our nation’s top 100 metropolitan areas, the employment prospects for teens and young adults dropped drastically. Indeed, Brookings used the word “plummeted” to describe changes the employment situation between 2000 and 2011. White youth had an official unemployment rate of 15.9 percent in April, while African-American youth have a rate of 36.8 percent, more than twice the White rate. These are just the official numbers. The unofficial numbers would suggest that a third of White youth, and about 70 percent of Black youth, are out of work.

Many choose to focus on adult unemployment. And certainly, the ability of adults to support their families is of greater concern. But in addition to earning money, the 16-19 year old population benefits from summer jobs because they learn work habits, such as promptness and appropriate dress, when they are exposed to the labor market. Many who do not find summer employment will find that later an employer will prefer someone who has worked to someone who had not.

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