Tightening your home could save you money

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NEW YORK (AP)—That precious, cooled air that leaks out of your home every summer is money leaking out of your checkbook.

Electricity prices are expected to rise faster this year than they have since 2009, to a record average of 12.5 cents per kilowatt-hour, according to the Energy Department. And prices are highest in the summer, just when you need more power to run the air conditioner.

But many residents are paying far more than they should to cool their homes because cold air is leaking out and hot, humid air is getting in. The air seeps through obvious places, like under doors, and not so obvious places, like cracks around plumbing that you can’t see.

“We accept a much higher level of bad performance in our homes than we would in our cars. You shouldn’t be uncomfortable.” says Jennifer Amann, director of the buildings program at the American Council for an Energy-Efficient Economy. “Homes don’t have to perform badly.”

To see if your home is a bad performer, try a thorough home energy audit. They are offered through utilities and local contractors and are often subsidized by state energy efficiency programs.

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