Daily Archive: November 5, 2013

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Sports

AP sources: Incognito sent racist texts

In this Sept. 30, 2013 file photo, Miami Dolphins guard Richie Incognito (68), second from left, and tackle Jonathan Martin (71), third from left, sit on the bench in the second half of an NFL football game against the New Orleans Saints in New Orleans. (AP Photo/Bill Feig, File) by Steven WineAP Football Writer DAVIE, Fla. (AP) — In the stadium program sold at the Miami Dolphins’ game on Halloween, Richie Incognito was asked who’s the easiest teammate to scare. His answer: Jonathan Martin. The troubled, troubling relationship between the two offensive linemen took an ominous turn Monday with fresh revelations: Incognito sent text messages to his teammate that were racist and threatening, two people familiar with the situation said.

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Sports

Panthers looking to regroup as Notre Dame looms

Pittsburgh Panthers tight end J.P. Holtz (86) makes the first down catch in front of Georgia Tech Yellow Jackets linebacker Quayshawn Nealy (54) in the second half of their NCAA college football game on Saturday, Nov. 2, 2013, in Atlanta. Georgia Tech won 21-10. (AP Photo/David Tulis) by Will GravesAP Sports Writer PITTSBURGH (AP) — Pittsburgh tight end J.P. Holtz doesn’t need to use last year’s three-overtime loss to Notre Dame as motivation to face the Fighting Irish again next Saturday. “Personally, I don’t like Notre Dame at all,” Holtz said Monday. “It’s going to make me play harder.”

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Entertainment

Duke Ellington: the man and his music

DUKE ELLINGTON (Courier File Photo) by Jerry HarkavyAssociated Press Writer “Duke: A Life of Duke Ellington” (Gotham Books), by Terry Teachout Duke Ellington died nearly 40 years ago, but for jazz fans of a certain age his musical creativity and elegant style remain timeless. Whether he was leading his orchestra in “Take the A Train,” the composition by collaborator Billy Strayhorn that became Ellington’s theme, or assuring his fans in his velvety bass-baritone that he loved them madly, the Duke’s public persona as a jazz giant has endured for half a century.

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Generation Y

‘I graduated with thousands of dollars left over’

Allie Nizam took an extra $10,000 with her when she graduated from University of Central Florida in 2009. (Photo Courtesy Allie Nizam) by Blake Ellis NEW YORK (CNNMoney) — While millions of Americans are drowning in student loan debt, some students are actually graduating with thousands of extra dollars to burn — thanks to scholarships and aid that exceeded their college costs.

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Business

Target removing criminal history section from job applications

Target Store in East Liberty (Photo courtesy ELDI) by Alexis TaylorFor New Pittsburgh Courier (NNPA)–Individuals seeking employment with the Target Corporation will soon notice a change in the company’s job applications. The Minneapolis-based company recently announced that they will no longer question applicants about their criminal history. The company said it expects to remove the question from applications nationwide in the coming year.

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Entertainment

Appeals court upholds dismissal of ‘Soul Man’ suit

by Brett BarrouquereAssociated Press Writer Sam Moore may be “The Legendary Soul Man,” but a federal appeals court says he doesn’t have sole use of the title. The U.S. 6th Circuit Court of Appeals on Thursday upheld the dismissal of Moore’s suit against the Weinstein Company and MGM studios over the 2008 film “Soul Men” and its soundtrack and promotions.

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Lifestyle

Refugee of religious cult tells her story

Elle Benet (Courtesy Photo) by Blair AdamsFor New Pittsburgh Courier (NNPA)–When Elle Benet looks back on her childhood, the memories are almost unbearable. For 18 years she lived in a world defined by verbal abuse and was part of a church that forced its members to live a life so austere that the outside world was held in disdain.

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Business

Chemical plants bring dangers, as well as jobs

Joshua Gray, a carpenter, and Josh Gibbons, a carpenter’s apprentice, came to Geismar, La., because construction jobs are plentiful. Gray holds some of the cards they need to show they have had safety and background checks. (Photo by Reid R. Frazier / The Allegheny Front) by Reid R. Frazier The Allegheny Front GEISMAR, La. – On a Thursday morning in June, Antionette West was lying on a couch in her trailer here, not far from a row of chemical plants near the Mississippi River, when the house began to shake. She initially thought there had been an explosion at a vinyl chloride plant about a mile away, where an explosion occurred last year. This time, she saw black smoke coming from another direction. It was from the Williams Olefins plant, an ‘ethane cracker.’ It’s the same type of plant that Shell is considering building in Monaca, Pa., in Beaver County. It makes ethylene and propylene from natural gas. Inside the Williams plant, three miles away, men were running for their lives. Two workers died and more than 100 were injured. Like many plants in this town between New Orleans and Baton Rouge, the plant is expanding. Geismar sits in the middle of Louisiana’s ‘chemical corridor,’ a 60-mile stretch where roughly a quarter of America’s petrochemicals are processed. Cheap shale gas has fueled a chemical industry expansion, promising thousands of jobs. “It’s the equivalent of a gold rush,” said Joshua Gray, a carpenter from Baton Rouge who’s come to town to work on some of the plant expansions.The jobs are plentiful, but they can be dangerous.