Daily Archive: November 4, 2013

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Health

What’s up with Obamacare and my healthcare?

In this Oct. 30, 2013 file photo, President Barack Obama speaks at Boston’s historic Faneuil Hall about the federal health care law. Now is when Americans start figuring out that President Barack Obama’s health care law goes beyond political talk, and really does affect them and people they know. (AP Photo/Charles Dharapak, File) by Jen Christensen (CNN) — As the politicians fuss and fight over the merits of the biggest overhaul of the health insurance system in this country, you may be wondering, “What does this all mean to me?” Here’s what we know so far about what’s up with your healthcare.

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National

JFK holds complex place in Black history

In this Nov. 22, 1963 file photo, women burst into tears outside Parkland Hospital upon hearing that President John F. Kennedy died from a shooting while riding in a motorcade in Dallas. (AP Photo/File) by Jesse WashingtonAP National Writer Not that many years ago, three portraits hung in thousands of African-American homes, a visual tribute to men who had helped Black people navigate the long journey to equality. There was Jesus, who represented unconditional hope, strength and love. There was Martin Luther King Jr., who personified the moral crusade that ended legal segregation. And then there was President John F. Kennedy.

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Entertainment

‘Saturday Night Live’ pokes fun at diversity issue

Kerry Washington arrives at the Academy of Television Art and Sciences’ event with the cast and producers of “Scandal”. (Photo by Richard Shotwell/Invision/AP) by David BauderAP Television Writer NEW YORK (AP) — With Kerry Washington as guest host, “Saturday Night Live” wasted no time poking fun at itself after receiving criticism for having no Black women among its 16 regular cast members.

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Sports

8 pros, 1 amateur compete for $8.4M WSOP prize

PHIL IVEY by Hannah DreierAssociated Press Writer LAS VEGAS (AP) — A club promoter and eight poker professionals, including one with a sideline as a tattoo artist, are back in Las Vegas to compete in the World Series of Poker main event and lay claim to the $8.4 million prize that goes to the winner. Seven players will become millionaires at the no-limit Texas Hold ‘em final table that runs Monday and Tuesday nights. The first player eliminated will take home only the $733,000 paid to all nine who made the finals in July. That’s when the tournament began with 6,352 players, before whittling down to the final nine through seven days of play at the Rio All-Suite Hotel & Casino.

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Entertainment

“A Love Supreme”…Fans hope Coltrane home can become NY museum

by Frank EltmanAssociated Press Writer DIX HILLS, N.Y. (AP) — In a quiet, tree-lined suburb of New York City sits an unassuming brick ranch house that many musicians consider hallowed ground. This is where saxophonist John Coltrane composed the epic 1964 jazz masterpiece “A Love Supreme,” shortly after moving into the Dix Hills, Long Island, home. Although he only lived there three years — Coltrane died of cancer in 1967 at age 40 — musicians including Carlos Santana and Coltrane’s son Ravi are among those backing a volunteer effort to turn the dilapidated, four-bedroom house into a museum and learning center.

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Metro

U.S. Coast Guard publishes proposed policy on moving frack wastewater by barge

Barge Photo by David Watson / Flickr by Emily DeMarco PublicSource The U.S. Coast Guard, which regulates the country’s waterways, will allow shale gas companies to ship fracking wastewater on the nation’s rivers and lakes under a proposed policy published Wednesday. The Coast Guard began studying the issue nearly two years ago at the request of its Pittsburgh office, which had inquiries from companies transporting Marcellus Shale wastewater.

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Opinion

Are African-American clergy doing enough?

The late Rev. James Bevel, an adviser to the Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King Jr., referred to preachers like Father Divine (pictured) as “religious entertainers.” (St. Louis American File Photo) Has the African-American Christian church lost its influence? Has it become weaker? Do some pastors spend too much time hiding in their churches? These are questions many people are asking, so it is time to examine and consider the power the Black church and Black preacher have had on our lives and history.