Daily Archive: November 1, 2013

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Metro

Black marrow donors needed for Crawley to win his bout with cancer

REX CRAWLEY The last thing Dr. Rex Crawley ever contemplated he’d have to worry about while in the process of getting his doctoral degree at Ohio State University was cancer. His mind was on courses, his thesis, but not being diagnosed with the big C. But in 1995, while at school, he was diagnosed with Non-Hodgkins Lymphoma, a cancer that starts in the lymphocytes, which are in the lymph nodes and other lymphoid tissue, such as the spleen and bone marrow. After being diagnosed, he weighed his treatment options and decided to have a bone marrow transplant, which left him in remission for more than 12 years. Then in 2011 he was re-diagnosed with NHL. The news of the return of the disease left him “surprised and devastated.” He underwent a grueling regimen of chemotherapy, which put him back in remission.

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Metro

Morial: Make strides in education, employment and empowerment

MARC MORIAL Ten years after his first visit as president of the National Urban League, Marc Morial returned to Pittsburgh as the keynote luncheon speaker for the 95th Anniversary celebration of the Urban League of Greater Pittsburgh. In his remarks on the State of Black America, Morial called Pittsburgh the “back bone” of industrialization and a city that continues to transform itself, adding that the State of Black Pittsburgh is not unlike the state of America, intrinsically intertwined and linked one to the other.

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Metro

B-PEP campaigns for Black judge on federal bench to replace Lancaster

Pictured in Courier file photo is Chief Judge Gary Lancaster who died suddenly April 24, 2013 at his home in Stanton Heights. He was 63. As part of its continuing efforts to promote diversity, the Black Political Empowerment Project has initiated a campaign to have an African-American appointed to the US District Court for Western Pennsylvania. The court has been without a Black judge since Chief Judge Gary Lancaster suffered a fatal heart attack in April. When he was appointed to the court in 2009, Lancaster was the only African-American serving on any U.S. District Court. In a letter dated Oct. 14, Tim Stevens, B-PEP president, began soliciting support from a variety of sources requesting President Obama make a new appointment, among those contacted are U.S. Sens. Bob Casey and Pat Toomey–who will ultimately make recommendations to the president, US Rep. Mike Doyle, D-Pa.; Pittsburgh Mayor Luke Ravenstahl; Democratic mayoral candidate Bill Peduto; and both Allegheny Democratic Party Chair Nancy Mills and Republican Party Chair Jim Roddey.

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Opinion

Bullying does not lead to suicide

RAYNARD JACKSON (NNPA)—Hardly a week goes by when there is not a tragic story of a teenager committing suicide. Tragic as these deaths are, there is absolutely no causation between bullying and suicide. The media’s simplistic and sensational coverage of these teenage deaths are very problematic in this regard. Suicide is never, let me repeat, suicide is never the result of one cause. Suicide is always the result of a culmination of events that triggers the deadly act; any one event could be the tips the scales.

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National

NY bus driver saves woman from jumping off bridge

In an Oct. 28, 2013, photo provided by the Niagara Frontier Transportation Authority, NFTA bus driver Darnell Barton poses in front of a bus in Buffalo, N.Y. (AP Photo/Niagara Frontier Transportation Authority, Doug Hartmayer) by Carolyn ThompsonAssociated Press Writer BUFFALO, N.Y. (AP) — A bus driver is being hailed as a hero for preventing a woman from jumping off a Buffalo highway overpass. About 20 McKinley High School students had just stepped aboard Darnell Barton’s Metro bus Oct. 18 when he spotted a woman who had climbed over a guardrail and stood leaning over the afternoon traffic zipping along the Scajaquada Expressway below.

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Entertainment

Professor of Music Emeritus Nathan Davis passes the torch to Geri Allen

GERI ALLEN Internationally acclaimed jazz pianist and composer Geri Allen (MA 1982, ethnomusicology) has stepped in as Director of Pitt’s Jazz Seminar and Concert, now in its 43rd year. Allen is continuing the legacy of Professor of Music Emeritus Nathan Davis, the founder and former director of the Pitt Jazz Seminar and Concert, who retired this summer. In January, Allen will join the faculty of the Department of Music as an associate professor and assume leadership of the Department’s program in Jazz Studies. Allen was one of the first to graduate from Howard University with a Bachelor of Arts degree in jazz studies. It was at Howard where she began to embrace music from all cultures and it has greatly influenced her work. She met Nathan Davis through one of her instructors who had studied under him. After graduation from Howard, while studying under Kenny Barron in New York City, Davis encouraged her to attend Pitt. She followed Davis’ advice and earned her master’s degree in ethnomusicology in 1982.

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Lifestyle

Ebenezer welcomes new shepherd after a year search

CHANGING OF THE GUARD—Rev. Dr. J. Van Alfred Winsett, pastor emeritus, hands over the church’s bible to Rev. Dr. Vincent K. Campbell. For more than a year, Ebenezer Baptist Church, in the historic Hill District, was without a senior pastor after the retirement of their longtime shepherd Rev. Dr. J. Van Alfred Winsett in May 2012. But the church that has overcome many obstacles, including two fires and a major rebuild, now welcomes new leadership into their next era under the direction of their new pastor-Rev. Dr. Vincent K. Campbell of Nashville, Tenn.

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People

Chris Brown has Mike Tyson worried

This July 15, 2009 file photo shows Mike Tyson arrives to the ESPY Awards. Photo by Jack Hannah/CNN/File) by Breeanna Hare (CNN)–As Chris Brown checks into rehab to “gain insight” into his behavior, another celebrity who’s pushed past a bad reputation is rooting for him.

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Business

Chester Engineers initiates African-American Leadership Institute

WORDS WELL TAKEN—Robert O. Agbede of Chester Engineers, Inc. encourages Robert H. Benmosche of AIG to keep up his good leadership. For almost three decades Robert O. Agbede has served as a role model, has been making an impact within the community and contributing to the African-American community. As president and CEO of Pittsburgh based Chester Engineers, a leading water/waste water facility, design build, scientific research and management company, he continues to serve as an example and is committed to giving back to the community. “As the leader of Chester Engineers my charge is to make sure we are not only a technically competent engineering company, but helping to improve the communities in which we live and work,” he admits.