Blackface costumes revive controversy at Halloween

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This 1920s image shows comedian Eddie Cantor wearing blackface while performing “If You Knew Susie.”  (AP Photo, File)

“It’s constantly a form of entertainment that backs itself into all kinds of trouble, whether political trouble around slavery or a kind of mental trouble having to do with fantasizing about Black people,” said Lott, who wrote the 1993 book “Love & Theft: Blackface Minstrelsy & the American Working Class.”

As for Hough, he said: “It’s just a stupid thing to do. It’s a racist thing to do. What blackface does is give the White people privilege of representing Black people, of taking black images and treating them as a thing owned.”

Kelsey Crowe, who teaches social work in San Francisco, has been following the fracas on Facebook. She sees more tribute to Crazy Eyes than hatred in Hough’s costume. Other recent examples are far more troubling, she said.

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“Trayvon Martin, that’s awful,” Crowe said of two Florida men whose photo circulated on social media ahead of Halloween on Thursday.

One was in blackface with a simulated bloody bullet hole at the chest and the other simulated a gun to the head of the faux 17-year-old while dressed as George Zimmerman, the neighborhood watch volunteer who fatally shot Trayvon in Florida and was acquitted in court.

She was also “not into” the minstrel costumes in Milan. But the look for Hough “didn’t strike me as exploitative at all,” she said.

“In other cases blackface is used to make fun of people. I really saw this as a way to embody a character that you like,” said Crowe, who will be a cat for Halloween with her 3-year-old daughter.

“Everybody likes the character of Crazy Eyes,” she added, “but I guess that could be said of Aunt Jemima, too.”

What if the “Rock of Ages” singer, dancer and actress had eliminated blackface from the equation, keeping her simulation of the Bantu knotted hairstyle worn by the character, along with the orange prison jumpsuit she and her friends zipped on as a posse of female inmates from the Netflix series?

“Yes, leave the skin color alone. Leave the stereotypical performance of it and I would imagine to some degree that could be middle ground,” Blay said. “People dress up as other people all the time. That’s what happens at Halloween. But she didn’t do that. And as far as Trayvon, no. Never.”

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Follow Leanne Italie on Twitter at http://twitter.com/litalie

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