Daily Archive: October 25, 2013

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National

Judge who changed baby’s name could be disciplined

Jaleesa Martin was ordered by a judge to change her baby son’s name from Messiah to Martin (AP Photo/File) by Travis LollerAssociated Press Writer NASHVILLE, Tenn. (AP) — An East Tennessee magistrate who ordered a baby’s name changed from Messiah to Martin has been charged with violating the state’s Code of Judicial Conduct.

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National

Boy who killed Nazi dad at age 10 to be sentenced

In this Oct. 22, 2010 file photo, Jeff Hall, who was killed by his son, holds a Neo Nazi flag while standing at Sycamore Highlands Park near his home in Riverside, Calif. (AP Photo/Sandy Huffaker, File) by Amy TaxinAssociated Press Writer SANTA ANA, Calif. (AP) — The boy was 10 when he put a gun to the head of his sleeping neo-Nazi father and pulled the trigger. It was over in an instant for Jeff Hall, but sorting out the fate of his troubled son has been a 2 1/2-year journey that approaches its final stage Friday in a hearing to determine where he’ll spend his teens and, possibly, his early adult years.

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Sports

At The Finish Line 10-25…Where Only the Truth Matters

Pitt basketball coach Jamie Dixon listens to a question at a news conference during the NCAA college Atlantic Coast Conference media day in Charlotte, N.C., Wednesday, Oct. 16, 2013. (AP Photo/Nell Redmond) • Pitt ACC Basketball tips off tonight and clearly it’s the exciting start of a new kind of basketball here in Pittsburgh. Tonight’s game is a warm-up against San Diego University but trust me, the heat is coming . . . in the form of North Carolina, Duke, N.C. State and others. But I expect Pitt to hold tight. Defense wins games and Jamie Dixon’s game is defense! • The St. Louis Cardinals will win the World Series on the back of their superior pitching. Boston is no door mat, but I see the Birds popping the cork in six games.

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Health

Making good decisions about your health

Candi Castleberry-Singleton, Chief inclusion officer, UPMC and Yvonne Cook, Vice president of community and health initiatives,Highmark Blue Cross Blue Shield Every day, people make decisions about their health care. They read directions on a prescription label. They determine how much medicine to take or give to a loved one. They see TV ads for specific medications. They have conversations with health care providers or their health insurance companies. People need to be able to understand health information. It is essential to good health. Health literacy is the degree to which people get, use and understand basic health information and services to make good health decisions. But research shows that most health information is not presented in a way that many adults easily understand. According to the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, more than one third of U.S. adults have difficulty with common health tasks, such as following directions on a prescription medicine label or sticking to a childhood immunization schedule using a chart. Not being able to do such tasks correctly can lead to serious health problems.

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Sports

Wacha, Beltran help Cards even World Series 1-all

In this multiple exposure image, St. Louis Cardinals starting pitcher Michael Wacha throws during the fifth inning of Game 2 of baseball’s World Series against the Boston Red Sox Thursday, Oct. 24, 2013, in Boston. (AP Photo/Matt Slocum) by Ronald BlumAP Sports Writer BOSTON (AP) — One is 22, brimming with vigor and riding a hot streak in the dawn of his career, the other is 36, injected with a painkiller just to make it on the field and refusing to succumb to discomfort during his first and perhaps last chance to earn that elusive ring. Michael Wacha and Carlos Beltran, both trying to make the most of their first World Series, helped lift the St. Louis Cardinals to a 4-2 victory over the Boston Red Sox on Thursday night that evened the matchup at a game apiece. “It’s the World Series, big-time game,” Wacha said. Wacha bested John Lackey in a matchup of present and past rookie sensations, Beltran provided a big hit and this time it was the Red Sox who were tripped up by fielding failures. “Somebody would have to kill me in order for me to get out of the lineup,” said Beltran, undeterred by bruised ribs that landed him in the hospital a night earlier.

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Lifestyle

Ribbon Room is new banquet hall in Clairton

MAIN HALL—Wandra Sparks and her husband, Wilbur Sparks, stand in the middle of the main hall of the Ribbon Room. (Photos by J.L. Martello) Lifelong Clairton resident Wandra Sparks always wanted to move the world in which she lived. She hopes to accomplish that dream with the recent opening of her new banquet hall, the Ribbon Room.

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Health

Take charge of your health today. Be informed. Be involved….Health Literacy

ESTHER BUSH These monthly pages focus on health disparities in the Pittsburgh region. They educate the reader about key health issues. They inform readers about research opportunities and community resources. All articles can be accessed online at the New Pittsburgh Courier Web site. The monthly series is a partnership of the New Pittsburgh Courier, Community PARTners (a core service of the University of Pittsburgh’s Clinical and Translational Science Institute—CTSI), the Urban League of Greater Pittsburgh and the UPMC Center for Inclusion.

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Opinion

A misguided Big Mac attack

RAYNARD JACKSON (NNPA)—Two weeks ago, I was sent a video of a Hispanic woman interrupting a speech by Jeff Stratton, president of McDonald’s USA. He was giving a speech at the Union League Club of Chicago. Nancy Salgado, the Hispanic woman in question, became Exhibit A for what’s gone wrong in today’s workforce: rudeness and what the Bible calls slothfulness.

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Lifestyle

Number of plus-size women outweighs number of fashion choices

This undated image provided by H&M shows plus-size model Jennie Runk, who is a size 12 or 14, in a swimsuit ad from 2012. (AP Photo/H&M) by Mae AndersonAP Retail Writer NEW YORK (AP) — When it comes to women’s clothing sizes, there’s some funny math going on. The average American woman is about 25 pounds heavier than she was in 1960. Yet women’s plus-size clothing, generally defined as size 14 and up, still makes up only about 9 percent of the $190 billion spent annually on clothes. What’s wrong with this equation? It’s not that plus-size women aren’t into fashion. Rather, the fashion industry doesn’t seem interested in them.