Daily Archive: October 16, 2013

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Entertainment

Hip-Hop and the ‘Double Life’

by Jineea Butler New York’s Hot 97.1 DJ Mr. Cee finally addressed his sexuality, after being arrested several times for illegally soliciting transsexual prostitutes. In many ways, he has been used as a poster boy for Hip Hop’s homophobic issues. In this day and age, should we be critical of anyone who leans towards same sex practices? I know that Hip Hop has had a reputation of casting out homosexuals, but are we looking at the same Hip Hop industry? The Hip Hop I encounter is filled with executives, artists, promoters, and designers etc. who are members of the LGBT Community. I think the real problem is everyone is trying to ignore it.

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People

Powell, Motown Records’ chief of charm, dies at 98

In this Aug. 26, 2013, file photo originally provided by the Motown Museum, Maxine Powell smiles during an event held in her honor at the Motown Museum in Detroit. (AP Photo/Motown Museum, Andre Smith, File) by Mike HouseholderAssociated Press Writer DETROIT (AP) — Maxine Powell, who was responsible for developing the charm, grace and style of Motown Records’ artists during the Detroit label’s 1960s heyday, died Monday at age 98. Motown Historical Museum CEO Allen Rawls said Powell died of natural causes at a hospital in Southfield, Mich.

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National

Sagging pants banned in some Texas restaurants

No Sagging Sign by Cierra Duncan HOUSTON (NNPA)-– Should “sagging” be banned? Some establishments think so. Two Houston McDonald’s locations recently joined the list of Texas restaurants that have banned customers wearing sagging pants with their underwear showing. Signs placed on the doors read, “Pull your pants up or don’t come in. Try to have some decency and respect for others. No one wants to see your underwear.” Children under the age of three are exempt.

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Entertainment

Blues museum to call St. Louis home, sweet home

A woman pushes a stroller past the site of the National Blues Museum, set to open next year, in St. Louis. (AP Photo/Jeff Roberson) by Alan Scher ZagierAssociated Press ST. LOUIS (AP) — Die-hard music lovers, casual fans and globe-trotting tourists readily embrace Chicago as the home of the blues, spurred in large part by the Great Migration northward of Southern Blacks in the early and mid-20th century. Robert Johnson, the genre’s godfather, famously sang of “Sweet Home Chicago,” and the Chicago Blues Festival draws more than 100,000 people each summer. But come next year, the National Blues Museum won’t find a home in Chicago, but in a rival Midwest city 300 miles to the south.

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Generation Y

Stephen Covey’s ’7 Habits’ shakes up schools

Students walk between classes past a sign extolling a leadership principle at Indian Trails Elementary school in Independence, Mo. (AP Photo/Charlie Riedel) by Heather HollingsworthAssociated Press Writer INDEPENDENCE, Mo. (AP) — One year after Johnathan Kent kicked his principal and school “went all bad,” the 8-year-old was recognized at a recent assembly as the “Star of the Month” for being polite and helping out his teachers. The third-grader’s explanation for the turnaround: “I’m not doing what I did last year.” But Emily Cross, the principal of Indian Trails Elementary on the outskirts of Kansas City, Mo., is giving some credit to a program the school began using last year that is built around the late self-help guru Stephen Covey’s best-selling “The Seven Habits of Highly Effective People.” A 25th anniversary edition of the 1989 book will be released in November.

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Business

The Black Mecca 50 years later: Did Atlanta get to the promised land?

by Kenya King A one-way ticket to anywhere in the U.S. after Hurricane Katrina brought a vast number of displaced New Orleanians to the hotbed of the South – Atlanta – where Black political power precipitates African-American entrepreneurship, and where a cultural melting pot begets the crux of artistic expression from Mozart to hip-hop. Even since the 1970s, and still today, Atlanta has been Christened as the Black Mecca and for many and is a city where African Americans are believed to have the best opportunities for prosperity or for reinventing themselves. Fifty years after of the March on Washington and the “I Have a Dream” speech, what has Black Atlanta achieved, and is it still a place for African Americans to thrive?

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Sports

Why I’m saying goodbye to football

by Roxanne Jones (CNN) — I fell in love on a Monday night. Now, many may say a teenage girl can’t know about such things. But that night as I watched Dallas Cowboys running back Tony Dorsett roll downfield 99 yards for a touchdown, I fell head-over-heals in love with the NFL. It was January 3, 1983 — Monday Night Football, Dallas vs. Minnesota. I’d never seen anything so inspiring. Dorsett was so free, so graceful and so powerful to me. He was focused and determined. Watching him break free of his competitors, those who wanted to bring him down and stop him from reaching his goal, I was in awe. And I knew then that his run capsulized all that I wanted to accomplish in my life.

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National

Cleveland police suspend 63 officers over deadly chase

Martha Williams sobs as she asks for answers in the death of her daughter, Malissa, at a community meeting about the shooting deaths of Malissa Williams and Timothy Russell, December 14, 2012 in East Cleveland, Ohio. (AP Photo/The Plain Dealer, Gus Chan/File) by John SeewerAssociated Press Writer A review of a deadly police chase in Cleveland nearly a year ago has led to suspensions for 63 patrol officers who violated orders and department rules, the city’s police chief said Tuesday. A fleeing driver and passenger were killed when officers fired 137 shots at them in the 23-minute chase that involved five dozen cruisers and wove through residential neighborhoods before ending in gunfire.