Daily Archive: October 14, 2013

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Entertainment

Review: Lady wails in soulful ‘Janis Joplin’ show

This theater image released by Boneau/Bryan-Brown shows Mary Bridget Davis performing in “A Night with Janis Joplin,” at the Lyceum Theatre in New York. Davies and her “A Night With Janis Joplin,” which opened Thursday, are part of a new wave of musicals featuring female singer-songwriters, a list that includes a Carole King musical making its way to Broadway. Performing with Davies is, background from left, Taprena Michelle Augustine, De’Adre Aziza, Allison Blackwell and Nikki Kimbrough. (AP Photo/Boneau/Bryan-Brown, Joan Marcus) by Jennifer FarrarAssociated Press Writer NEW YORK (AP) — Legendary blues and soul singer Janis Joplin was an astounding force of nature onstage and off. A new concert musical on Broadway provides a rockin’ good time while imaginatively evoking her impassioned, thrilling talent. Randy Johnson wrote and directed the tribute, “A Night With Janis Joplin.” Featuring a powerful performance by Mary Bridget Davies as Joplin alongside a quartet of extremely talented singers, the loud, colorful, ’60s-saturated spectacle opened Thursday night at the Lyceum Theatre.

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International

Artists, educators laud Black heritage in DR

In this Sept. 27, 2013 photo, Dominican actresses Clara Morel, left, and Luz Bautista Matos, of the theater group “Arbol Maravilloso,” or “Wonderful Tree,” pose for a photo after their performance for school children in Moca, Dominican Republic. Their theater group has visited schools across the country to spread the word among Black children that their features and heritage should be a source of pride. (AP Photo/Manuel Diaz) by Ezequiel Abiu LopezAssociated Press Writer SANTO DOMINGO, Dominican Republic (AP) — In a school auditorium filled with laughing students, actresses Luz Bautista Matos and Clara Morel threw themselves into acting out a fairy tale complete with a princess, a hero and acts of derring-do. Morel had wrapped a white plastic sheet around her multi-colored blouse, while Bautista donned a brown paper bag over her blue tights. The two Black actresses wore their hair free and natural, decorated only with single pink flowers. “Yes, you’re a princess,” said Bautista to Morel, who fretted that she didn’t look like a traditional princess with her dark complexion and hair. Bautista then turned to a young girl sitting in the front row, who shared the same African-descended features as both actresses. “And you too,” Morel said as the child smiled back at her. The theater group Wonderful Tree has visited schools all over Santo Domingo and some in the countryside to spread the word among Black children that their features and heritage should be a source of pride. That message, though simple, has been nothing less than startling in this Caribbean country, where 80 percent of people are classified as mulattos, meaning they have mixed Black-White ancestry, but where many still consider being labeled Black an offense.

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National

Furloughed workers pinching pennies, volunteering

Army Reserve Staff Sgt. Catherine Threat watches students as they arrive at Courtenay Elementary Language Arts Center in Chicago in this Oct. 7, 2013 file photo taken in Chicago. (AP Photo/M. Spencer Green, File) by Russ BynumAssociated Press They’re experienced research engineers and park rangers still in college, attorneys who enforce environmental regulations and former soldiers who took civilian jobs with the military after coming home from war. And all of them have one thing in common: They were sent home on unpaid furlough last week after a political standoff between the president and Congress forced a partial shutdown of the federal government. More than 800,000 federal workers were affected at first, though the Pentagon has since recalled most of its idled 350,000 employees.

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International

After Kenya mall attack, children’s trauma lingers

14-month old Azzurra sits with a lipstick kiss on her cheek from her mother Cynthia Carpino, both of whom were caught up in the Westgate Mall attack, at their apartment in Nairobi, Kenya. (AP Photo/Ben Curtis) by Rukmini CallimachiAssociated Press Writer NAIROBI, Kenya (AP) — When the shooting began at the Nairobi mall, Cynthia Carpino and her husband hid in the parking lot. But their 1-year-old daughter wouldn’t stop crying. To muffle her cries, her father placed his hand over her mouth so hard she almost suffocated. Little Azzurra fainted in his arms, and three weeks later she’s still not right.

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Metro

Illegal guns easy to find on streets of Pittsburgh

RICHARD CARRINGTON Three years ago after community activist Richard Carrington’s home was broken into, someone knocked on his door offering to sell him the same gun stolen from his house. The seller had no idea it was Carrington’s gun. “My shotgun came back to my front door with someone trying to sell it to me,“ Carrington said. “A lot of these guns are floating from place to place.”

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Opinion

Yes, mental illness affects ‘us’

GEORGE E. CURRY (NNPA)—On Sept. 16 the news was shocking: A contract employee who worked at the Navy Yard in Washington, D.C., later identified as Aaron Alexis, killed 12 innocent people in the facility before he was killed by police. For many African-Americans, our first thought was: “I hope it wasn’t one of us.” On Oct. 3, there was another disturbing incident in the nation’s capital: An unarmed woman with her 1-year-old child in the car, drove her vehicle into barriers outside the White House and on Capitol Hill before being shot to death by police.