Daily Archive: September 17, 2013

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Entertainment

‘Higher!’ celebrates Sly & The Family Stone

Sly & The Family Stone by Bobbi Booker (NNPA)–Sly & The Family Stone laid down a template that not only inspired an era of youhful rebellion and independence as the 60s became the 70s, the group also had – and continues to have – a potent effect on the course of modern music in general. The creativity of the mixed-race, mixed-gender and mixed-genre band shines in “Higher!” (Epic/Legacy Records), the new 77-track, four-cd box set.

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National

Obama laments shooting as gun debate has gone cold

President Barack Obama speaks in the South Court Auditorium on the White House complex, Sept. 16, 2013, in Washington. (AP Photo/Pablo Martinez Monsivais) by Nedra PicklerAssocitaed Press Writer WASHINGTON (AP) — President Barack Obama on Monday wearily lamented “yet another mass shooting,” this time in the nation’s capital where the debate that raged earlier this year over tightening firearms laws has stalled amid opposition from gun-rights advocates.

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National

Employment gap between rich, poor widest on record

Annette Guerra poses for a photo at her home in San Antonio. Guerra, 33, has been looking for a full-time job for more than a year after finishing nursing school. (AP Photo/Eric Gay)by Hope YenAP Business Writer WASHINGTON (AP) — The gap in employment rates between America’s highest- and lowest-income families has stretched to its widest levels since officials began tracking the data a decade ago, according to an analysis of government data conducted for The Associated Press. Rates of unemployment for the lowest-income families — those earning less than $20,000 — have topped 21 percent, nearly matching the rate for all workers during the 1930s Great Depression.

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National

Too edgy? Too tame? Gay pride parades spark debate

Overview shot of the crowd during concert with Melissa Etheridge at Pittsburgh Gay PrideFest 2012. Nationally, there’s no question that pride parades have become more mainstream and family-friendly as more gays and lesbians raise children, and more heterosexuals turn out to watch. With the surge of corporate sponsorships, they’ve become a big business in some cities. As a result, there’s disagreement within the gay community as to what sort of imagery the parades should present.(Courier Photo/J.L. Martello/File) by David CraryAP National Writer Initiated as small, defiant, sexually daring protests, gay pride parades have become mainstream spectacles patronized by corporate sponsors and straight politicians as they spread nationwide. For many gays, who prize the events’ edginess, the shift is unwelcome – as evidenced by bitter debate preceding Sunday’s parade in Dallas.