Daily Archive: August 5, 2013

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National

Today in History Aug. 5

South African anti-apartheid activist Nelson Mandela Nelson Mandela is pictured outside of Westminster Abbey in 1962 — this trip, without permission from the South Africa government, led to his indictment and arrest on August 5, 1962; it was the beginning of 27 years of imprisonment. Today is Monday, Aug. 5, the 217th day of 2013. There are 148 days left in the year. Today’s Highlight in History: On August 5, 1953, Operation Big Switch began as remaining prisoners taken during the Korean War were exchanged at Panmunjom.

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National

Sikh temple attack united victim’s son, ex-racist

In this July 31, 2013, photo, Pardeep Kaleka, right, and Arno Michaelis pose for a photo at the Sikh Temple of Wisconsin in Oak Creek, Wis. At left is a bullet hole from a shooting at the temple a year ago when a white supremacist shot and killed six temple members, including Kaleka’s father, Satwant Singh Kaleka. (AP Photo/Morry Gash) by Dinesh RamdeAssociated Press Writer OAK CREEK, Wis. (AP) — Six weeks after a White supremacist gunned down Pardeep Kaleka’s father and five others at a Sikh temple last year, Kaleka was skeptical when a former skinhead reached out and invited him to dinner. But Kaleka accepted, and he’s grateful he did. Since then, the grieving son and repentant racist have formed an unlikely alliance, teaming up to preach a message of peace throughout Milwaukee. In fact, they’ve grown so close that they got matching tattoos on their palms — the numbers 8-5-12, the date the gunman opened fire at a Milwaukee-area Sikh temple before killing himself minutes later.

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National

A Special Delivery Birth: 4:13 A.M. in Baltimore, an arrival that wouldn’t wait

Proud parents Gerard and Wendy Talley delivered their son together in an SUV Saturday night. Talley says her water broke in the car as they tried to drop off their 2-year-old with family before heading to the University of Maryland hospital downtown. (AFRO Photo/Alexis Taylor) by Blair Adams (NNPA)–Three days past her due date, a Baltimore mother-to-be gave birth in the front seat of her SUV to her second child, while she and her husband attempted to make it to the hospital in the early hours of July 27.

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Sports

Former Pirate Nyjer Morgan adjusting to life in Japan

In this July 27, 2013 photo, Yokohama DeNa BayStars Nyjer Morgan watches his RBI infield single for the go-ahead run in front of Hanshin Tigers catcher Akira Fujii in the six inning of a baseball game at Koshien Stadium in Nishinomiya, western Japan. (AP Photo/Kyodo News) NAGOYA, Japan (AP) — Given his past as a two-sport athlete (ice hockey and baseball), former Milwaukee Brewers outfielder Nyjer Morgan figured he would have no trouble adjusting to Japan’s unique brand of baseball. A slow start and demotion to the minor leagues may have shaken that confidence, but Morgan is now starting to make a major impact with the Yokohama DeNa BayStars of Japan’s Central League. The 33-year-old native of San Francisco is batting .303 with 31 RBIs and a career-high seven home runs in 67 games as the No. 3 hitter for the BayStars.

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Sports

Former Pitt star Stephens-Howling right at home with Steelers

Pittsburgh Steelers running back LaRod Stephens-Howling (34) runs in drills at practice during NFL football training camp at the team training facility in Latrobe, Pa. on Monday, July 29, 2013 . (AP Photo/Keith Srakocic) LATROBE, Pa. (AP) – At 5-foot-7, LaRod Stephens-Howling doesn’t feel out of place during some of the Pittsburgh Steelers’ more size-oriented training camp drills. The running back has held his own during short-yardage and goal-line exercises and has looked right at home in “backs-on-backers” protection drills. It has helped that playing for the Steelers has made Stephens-Howling feel like he’s home – even if he didn’t join the team until just this past offseason.

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Business

New jobs disproportionately low-pay or part-time

In this Aug. 1, 2013, photo, a “Now Hiring” sign hangs in front of a new McDonald’s restaurant under construction in Tempe, Ariz. (AP Photo/Ross D. Franklin) WASHINGTON (AP) — The 162,000 jobs the economy added in July were a disappointment. The quality of the jobs was even worse. A disproportionate number of the added jobs were part-time or low-paying — or both. Part-time work accounted for more than 65 percent of the positions employers added in July. Low-paying retailers, restaurants and bars supplied more than half July’s job gain.

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Entertainment

Review: Chante Moore shines on new album

Chante Moore by Kimberly C. Roberts For quite some time, the underrated and underappreciated Chante Moore has been one of my favorite female singers, and her new release, an eclectic and appealing 10-track collection titled “Moore Is More,” definitely served to solidify her status.

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National

Miss. law requires cord blood from some teen moms

Rep. Adrienne Wooten, D-Jackson addresses the House chamber during debate over a Medicaid reauthorization bill at the Capitol in Jackson, Miss. Wooten voted against a cord blood bill that says if a girl younger than 16 gives birth in Mississippi and won’t name the father authorities must collect umbilical cord blood and run DNA tests to prove paternity. (AP Photo/Rogelio V. Solis, File) JACKSON, Miss. (AP) — If a girl younger than 16 gives birth and won’t name the father, a new Mississippi law — likely the first of its kind in the country — says authorities must collect umbilical cord blood and run DNA tests to prove paternity as a step toward prosecuting statutory rape cases. Supporters say the law is intended to chip away at Mississippi’s teen pregnancy rate, which has long been one of the highest in the nation. But critics say that though the procedure is painless, it invades the medical privacy of the mother, father and baby. And questions abound: At roughly $1,000 a pop, who will pay for the DNA tests in the country’s poorest state? Even after test results arrive, can prosecutors compel a potential father to submit his own DNA and possibly implicate himself in a crime? How long will the state keep the DNA on file?