Daily Archive: July 8, 2013

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National

AP source: Heinz Kerry showed symptoms of seizure

Secretary of State John Kerry, right, whispers to his wife Teresa Heinz Kerry during the ceremonial swearing-in for him as the 68th secretary of state, at the State Department in Washington. A hospital spokesman says Teresa Heinz Kerry, the wife of U.S. Secretary of State John Kerry, is hospitalized Sunday, July 7, 2013 in critical but stable condition in a Nantucket hospital. (AP Photo/Manuel Balce Ceneta, File) by Bridget Murphy and Matthew Lee Associated Press Writers BOSTON (AP) — Teresa Heinz Kerry, the wife of U.S. Secretary of State John Kerry and heir to a ketchup company fortune, was hospitalized in critical but stable condition Monday, a day after showing symptoms consistent with a seizure, a person in close contact with the family said.

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Metro

Duquesne child’s wish for Kennywood granted

Brayden Thompson poses with Kenny Kangaroo courtesy of Make-A-Wish, on June 30. (Courier Photo/J.L. Martello) While illness can be tough on adults, it’s even tougher on children, but one local organization is working to make sure that children with life threatening illnesses get a chance to forget about their illness and have their wishes come true.

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Metro

16th Street Bridge renamed after famed historian McCullough

In this May 10, 2012 photo, author David McCullough, two-time Pulitzer Prize winner for books “Truman” and “John Adams,” walks around the Brooklyn Bridge while being interviewed in New York. (AP Photo/Bebeto Matthews) PITTSBURGH (AP) – A Pittsburgh bridge has been renamed for Pulitzer Prize-winning historian David McCullough on his 80th birthday.

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Generation Y

Obamacare: Health insurers fear young people will opt out

College student Francois Louis, 20, poses for a photo in Davie, Fla. Louis can’t remember the last time he went to the doctor and gets by on over the counter medication or health remedies whenever he’s sick. He’d love to be able to the doctor and have a check-up, but says it’s just too expensive on his salary of less than $15,000 a year. For millions of unemployed and underemployed twenty-somethings, many who are still living at home in the wake of a recession, health care has been out of reach. Now sweeping federal health laws are promising make coverage more affordable, but the big question remains, will it be affordable enough? (AP Photo/Wilfredo Lee) by Kelli KennedyAssociated Press Writer MIAMI (AP) — Dan Lopez rarely gets sick and hasn’t been to a doctor in 10 years, so buying health insurance feels like a waste of money. Even after the federal health overhaul takes full effect next year, the 24-year-old said he will probably decide to pay the $100 penalty for those who skirt the law’s requirement that all Americans purchase coverage.

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Metro

Ravenstahl’s profile wanes with feds’ probe

In this file photo from March 1, 2013, Pittsburgh Mayor Luke Ravenstahl takes questions during a news conference where he announced he has abandoned his bid to seek reelection in Pittsburgh. (AP Photo/Keith Srakocic) by Joe MandakAssociated Press Writer PITTSBURGH (AP) — The public couldn’t avoid Luke Ravenstahl when he became the youngest mayor of a major U.S. city nearly seven years ago, even appearing on “Late Night with David Letterman.” Now a 33-year-old lame duck, Ravenstahl governs bunker-style and is rarely seen since a federal grand jury probe claimed his hand-picked police chief and now appears to be focusing on Ravenstahl himself.

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Business

Temporary jobs becoming a permanent fixture in US

Clairessa Mills looks over the main desk for help at the Labor Ready temporary employment agency in Warren, Ohio. The number of temps has jumped more than 50 percent since the recession ended four years ago to nearly 2.7 million, the most on government records dating to 1990. In no other sector has hiring come close. (AP Photo/Amy Sancetta, FIle) by Christopher S. Rugaber AP Economics Writer WASHINGTON (AP) — Hiring is exploding in the one corner of the U.S. economy where few want to be hired: Temporary work. From Wal-Mart to General Motors to PepsiCo, companies are increasingly turning to temps and to a much larger universe of freelancers, contract workers and consultants. Combined, these workers number nearly 17 million people who have only tenuous ties to the companies that pay them — about 12 percent of everyone with a job.