Daily Archive: July 2, 2013

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International

South Africa: apartheid-era leader falls ill

F.W. DE KLERK AND NELSON MANDELA (AP Photo/File) by Christopher Torchia JOHANNESBURG (AP) – F.W. de Klerk, the last leader of South Africa’s apartheid era and a co-recipient of the 1993 Nobel Peace Prize with Nelson Mandela, has suffered dizziness and will be fitted with a pacemaker to help his heart function, a foundation said Tuesday.

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People

Soledad O’Brien to do work for Al Jazeera America

This March 26, 2013 file photo shows journalist Soledad O’Brien at a birthday party for Chaka Kahn in New York. (Photo by Andy Kropa/Invision/AP, file) NEW YORK (AP) — Former CNN anchor Soledad O’Brien will be contributing reports to the new Al Jazeera America network when it debuts in August.

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National

Former US Rep. William Gray, first Black majority whip and longtime Philly pastor, dies at 71

WILLIAM HERBERT GRAY, III (1941–2013) by Ron Todt PHILADELPHIA (AP) — Former U.S. Rep. William H. Gray III, who rose to influential positions in Congress and was the first black to become majority whip, died Monday at 71. Gray passed away suddenly Monday while in London with one of his sons to attend the Wimbledon tennis championships, said William Epstein, a former aide to Gray.

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Sports

Proud Pirates won’t rest on their surging success

In this photo from Sunday, June 30, Pirates’ Andrew McCutchen (22) warms up in the on deck circle at PNC Park during a baseball game against the Milwaukee Brewers on in Pittsburgh. The Pirates won this game, 2-1 in 14 innings, stretching their current win streak to nine games. The team with the best record in baseball isn’t trying to think too far down the road. After 20 seasons of losing, the first-place Pittsburgh Pirates are just trying to enjoy the moment. (AP Photo/Keith Srakocic) by Chris Adamski PITTSBURGH (AP) — As the owner of the locker just to the right of the main entrance to the common area of the Pittsburgh Pirates clubhouse, Garrett Jones arguably has the best panoramic view among his teammates as he sits at his stall. Since first establishing himself as a major-league regular with Pittsburgh three years ago, the players he sees when he surveys the clubhouse has changed dramatically. So have the results. The Pirates are the toast of baseball, owners of the majors’ best record at their precise midpoint of their season (51-30). Should they maintain that pace over the next three months, they would win 102 games just three seasons after the desultory 2010 Pirates lost 105.

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Opinion

On solving the puzzle of Clarence Thomas

JUSTICE CLARENCE THOMAS (AP Photo/Sidney Davis/File) by Daryl Gale Last week was an up and down week for the progressives and minorities who have been closely watching the movements of the Supreme Court. There was jubilation upon news of the ruling that gay marriage is probably about to become settled law, with the Defense of Marriage Act torn to shreds; and hair-pulling frustration at the word that key portions of the Voting Rights Act, the landmark legislation that represents the greatest victory of the civil rights era, were scuttled because — and this may be news to some of you — America has apparently gotten over its criminally racist tendencies and every individual’s right to vote is already protected. We’ll get back to that bogus assertion in a minute, but for now, I’d like to talk about the one member of the Supreme Court whose opinions and behavior continued to baffle me until this week — our old friend Clarence Thomas.