Daily Archive: June 23, 2013

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Sports

Liriano, Pirates beat Angels 6-1

Pittsburgh Pirates starting pitcher Francisco Liriano throws to the plate during the first inning of their baseball game against the Los Angeles Angels, Saturday, June 22, 2013, in Anaheim, Calif. (AP Photo/Mark J. Terrill) by Joe Resnick ANAHEIM, Calif. (AP) — The Pittsburgh Pirates have been making a lot of noise this season and are tempting their long-suffering fans again with the possibility of a winning season for the first time since rookie Gerrit Cole was still in diapers. Francisco Liriano took a shutout into the seventh inning, and Andrew McCutchen, Pedro Alvarez and Gaby Sanchez homered, leading the Pittsburgh Pirates to a 6-1 victory over the Los Angeles Angels on Saturday night. “It was awesome just to be able to do that, and we had a lot of fun doing it,” said McCutchen, who ended a homerless drought of 98 at-bats. “This is the way we should come out and play every day. We don’t have to depend on just one or two guys. Everybody’s coming through. To have a complete lineup like that from top to bottom is always fun.”

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Lifestyle

From Kanye West to Cher, here are our five favorite ALL-CAPS rants

Kanye West interrupting an acceptance speech by Taylor Swift at the MTV Video Music Awards, Sept. 13, 2009.(AP Photo/Brad Barket—PictureGroup) By Doug Gross (CNN) — Last week, the U.S. Navy forsook a tradition dating back to the 1800s. Why? Because it’s now too easily confused with the musings of an Internet lunatic. Naval commanders this week announced that they would be getting rid of a rule that all official communications should be in all-caps. It’s a tradition dating to the 1850s, when the military used teletype machines that didn’t have lowercase letters. The change is meant to simplify communication and is supposed to save the Navy $15 million because it can get rid of a dedicated messaging service and use regular old e-mail instead. But we have to think not wanting to sound like you’re shouting at someone who SAID SOMETHING WRONG ON THE INTERNET played a role, too. The most gentle message can come across as psychotically aggressive when typed in all caps. So as the Navy transitions, we decided to round up five of our favorite examples of all-cap craziness.

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National

King’s 1963 Detroit march remembered with walk

Dignitaries at the front of the Freedom Walk include, left to right, Rev. Wendell Anthony, president of the Detroit Branch of the NAACP; Martin Luther King, III; Rev. Al Sharpton of the National Action Network, Roslyn Brock, chairman of the NAACP; Detroit Mayor Dave Bing; and Rev. Jesse Jackson of the Rainbow Push Coalition Saturday, June 22, 2013 in Detroit. (AP Photo/Detroit News, John T. Greilick) DETROIT (AP) — Thousands participated in a Detroit march commemorating the 50th anniversary of one that Martin Luther King Jr. led in 1963. The walk down Woodward Avenue on Saturday morning culminated in a riverfront rally at Hart Plaza. The civil rights icon visited Detroit on June 23, 1963, to lead tens of thousands in a freedom walk and also previewed his “I Have a Dream” speech.

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People

Wimbleton Spat: Williams, Sharapova trade volleys

Serena Williams of the U.S., right, shakes hands with Russia’s Maria Sharapova, left, after defeating Sharapova in two sets 6-4, 6-4, in the women’s final of the French Open tennis tournament, at Roland Garros stadium in Paris, Saturday June 8, 2013. (AP Photo/Michel Spingler) by Howard Fendrich LONDON (AP) — As her agent nodded along approvingly from a front-row seat, Serena Williams sounded contrite and composed. Well-rehearsed, too. Williams even managed to crack herself up with a couple of jokes during her news conference at Wimbledon as the defending champion, where the primary topic was hardly her 31-match winning streak or her bid for a sixth title at the All England Club or her injured sister Venus’ absence from the field. Instead, more than half the questions at Sunday’s session revolved around themes generating the most buzz on the eve of tennis’ oldest and most prestigious Grand Slam tournament: what Williams was quoted as saying in a recent magazine article — and Maria Sharapova’s surprisingly forceful verbal swipe in reaction to that story.