Daily Archive: June 16, 2013

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Metro

Toomey Update: Two judges confirmed for PA’s Eastern District including first Latina

Last week, the Senate voted to confirm Judges Nitza Quiñones Alejandro and Jeffrey Schmehl as U.S. District Judges for the Eastern District of Pennsylvania. President Obama nominated these two judges last November upon a joint recommendation from Sen. Bob Casey and me. Since joining the Senate, I’ve worked closely with Sen. Casey to fill Pennsylvania’s judicial vacancies with qualified, experienced judges who have unquestioned honesty, ability and integrity. I believe both of these individuals meet this high standard.

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People

Family tweets indicate Kim Kardashian gives birth

Kim Kardashian poses for photographers at the red carpet during the 40th anniversary of Cosmopolitan magazine in Spanish in Mexico City. Kardashian reportedly gave birth to a baby girl in Los Angeles. (AP Photo/Marco Ugarte, File) by John Rogers LOS ANGELES (AP) — It looks to be a baby girl for Kim Kardashian and her rapper boyfriend Kanye West. Or does it? The couple was keeping silent Sunday in the wake of multiple reports that Kardashian has given birth over the weekend, about a month premature. But Kardashian’s sister Khloe appears to have let a rather cryptic cat out of the bag on Twitter.

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Sports

Tiger matches worst score in a major

Tiger Woods acknowledges the gallery after putting on the 18th hole during the third round of the U.S. Open golf tournament at Merion Golf Club, Saturday, June 15, 2013, in Ardmore, Pa. (AP Photo/Gene J. Puskar) Tiger Woods hits down the 18th hole during the fourth round of the U.S. Open golf tournament at Merion Golf Club, Sunday, June 16, 2013, in Ardmore, Pa. (AP Photo/Gene J. Puskar) Woods matches worst score in a major ARDMORE, Pa. (AP) — This isn’t the kind of record Tiger Woods had in mind at the U.S. Open. Woods went out-of-bounds on his second tee shot of the final round at Merion and closed with a 4-over 74. That gave him his worst 72-hole score as a pro in the U.S. Open, and it tied for his high score in any major. “I did a lot of things right,” Woods said. “Unfortunately, I did a few things wrong, as well.” Woods finished at 13-over 293. His previous high score in a U.S. Open was 290 at The Olympic Club in 1998 and Shinnecock Hills in 2004. Woods shot 294 at Oakland Hills in 1996 as an amateur. Just two days ago, Woods was four shots out of the lead and very much in the hunt to end his five-year drought in the majors. Then, he went 76-74 for his worst weekend in a major championship. Just over two weeks ago, the world’s No. 1 player had won three of his last four events on the PGA Tour and was starting to establish his dominance.

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Metro

Report faults Heinz Endowments head for gas ties

A large drilling rig sits outside the Covelli Center with some of the Youngstown, Ohio skyline in the background. Officials say drilling in Ohio’s Utica shale region nearly doubled the output of oil and natural gas there since 2011, although some industry experts remain cautious about the long-term potential for production. (AP Photo/Mark Stahl, File) by Kevin Begos PITTSBURGH (AP) — The head of an influential charity is being criticized for his ties to the oil and gas industry, but some experts say the allegations are misguided. The Public Accountability Initiative, a liberal-leaning group that investigates corporations and businesses, released a report last week claiming that Robert Vagt, the president of Pittsburgh-based Heinz Endowments, hadn’t fully disclosed his ties to the oil and gas industry and his current membership on the board of Houston-based Kinder Morgan Inc., the largest operator of natural gas pipelines in the U.S. The report also criticized the Endowments, which are separate from the giant food company, for providing funding for the Center for Sustainable Shale Development, which works with the gas drilling industry to reduce pollution.

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National

Affirmative action ruling contest: race vs. class

In this Sept. 27, 2012 photo, students walk through the University of Texas at Austin campus in Austin, Texas. This giant flagship campus – once slow to integrate – is now among the most diverse the country. (AP Photo/Eric Gay, File) by Justin PopeAP Education Writer In post-Great Recession America, which is the bigger barrier to opportunity — race or class? A decade ago, the U.S. Supreme Court kept the focus on race as a barrier, upholding the right of colleges to make limited use of racial preferences to ensure a diverse student body. But in a ruling due this month, the court is widely expected to roll back that decision. Such an outcome would shift attention more toward a less constitutionally controversial practice: giving a boost to socio-economically disadvantaged students, regardless of race. If that happens, it would reflect more than just a more conservative makeup of the justices. Over the last decade, clogged social mobility and rising economic inequality have shifted the conversation on campuses and in the country as a whole. As a barrier to opportunity, class is getting more attention, while race is fading.

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National

Glasnost on the Potomac under Obama? Not quite

BARACK OBAMA (AP Photo/Pablo Martinez Monsivais) by Calvin Woodard WASHINGTON (AP) — It’s as if the United States has two governments, one open and one very much not. President Barack Obama leads both, trying not to butt heads with himself. Since becoming president, Obama has churned out an impressive stream of directives flowing from his promise to deliver “the most transparent administration in history.” He established a center devoted to declassifying records and making them public. He announced an open government initiative. Dizzying quantities of information poured into public databases. New ways were devised to show taxpayers how their money is spent. Allegiance was pledged to the rule of law. Then there’s the other government. It prosecutes leakers like no administration before it. It exercises state-secrets privileges to quash court cases against it. It hides a vast array of directives and legal opinions underpinning government actions — not just intelligence and not all of it about national security. Now it’s known to conduct sweeping phone-records and Internet surveillance of ordinary people in programs kept on the lowdown until an employee of a National Security Agency contractor revealed them. Dick Cheney said this would happen.

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Entertainment

This Father’s Day we celebrate the legacy of TV dads

Sherman Hemsley was TV dad George Jefferson in ‘The Jeffersons. by Myron Mays As far back as television goes, TV dads have been a common figure. They were prominent on older shows such as “Leave it to Beaver,” “My Three Sons” and the “Dick Van Dyke Show.” And no less so later on with African-American viewers, thanks to shows such as “Sanford & Son,” “The Jeffersons” and “Good Times.” I’m not really sure why it took so long for shows with African-American dads to be presented to America. There have always been strong and present Dads in the African-American household.

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Generation Y

Christian college expels lesbian, charges tuition

Danielle Powell, right, and her spouse Michelle Rogers are photographed in Omaha, Neb., June 12, 2013. (AP Photo/Nati Harnik) by Margery A. Beck OMAHA, Neb. (AP) — Danielle Powell was going through a hard time in the spring of 2011, just months away from graduating from a conservative Christian college in Nebraska. She had fallen in love with another woman, a strictly forbidden relationship at a school where even prolonged hugs were banned.