Daily Archive: June 15, 2013

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National

Family Seeks Help for Child with Rare Disease

by Alice Thomas-Tisdale On June 25, Janiya Bowens will be 10 years old. Quite a feat for Jackson’s little champion. Since age six, Janiya has struggled to maintain her balance, keep her eyes open, move her limbs, keep her food down, swallow, and lately, smile or utter a single word. Janiya suffers from spinocerebellar ataxias. It is a hereditary defect in a certain gene that makes abnormal proteins. The abnormal proteins hamper the ability of nerve cells, primarily in the cerebellum and spinal cord, to function properly and cause them to degenerate over time. As the disease progresses, coordination problems worsen.

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International

Obama must see Africa in a new light

by Jesse L. Jackson, Sr. (NNPA)–When President Obama and the first lady travel to Africa at the end of this month, they will receive a rapturous greeting. The president’s deep roots in Kenya, the land of his father, resonate throughout the continent. His success in the United States evokes pride and joy in Africa. I write this from Nigeria, a country that has just celebrated its 14th year of democracy. President Obama’s election enabled Africans to see America in a new light. I hope his visit will enable Americans to see Africa with new eyes.

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National

African Americans disproportionately affected by disasters

Hurricane Katrina slammed into the Gulf Coast on Aug. 29, 2005, causing billions of dollars of damage and a death toll in the thousands. (Photo courtesy of Dan Anderson) by Stacy M. BrownSpecial to the NNPA from The Washington Informer The tornado which devastated an Oklahoma town last month has once again sparked debate about emergency preparedness, particularly in the African American community where disaster readiness hasn’t always been a priority. “We’ve seen the effects of September 11, Hurricane Katrina, and other disasters. We’ve also seen the effects they have had, especially on Black people,” said Cindy Vaughn, a Prince George’s County resident. “However, we (African Americans) tend not to pay too much attention to these things and that’s one of the main reasons why we’re not always prepared when natural disasters and other tragedies strike,” she said. The attitude toward preparedness among America’s Black population remains nonchalant despite frequent disaster occurrences and rising death tolls, according to several studies.

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Generation Y

College: ‘The best four or five years of your life’

by Maya Rhodan NNPA Washington Correspondent WASHINGTON (NNPA) – When Mecala Holmes was a freshman at Howard University in 2008, she recalls seeing a t-shirt in the school’s book store that read “Howard University, the best four or five years of your life.” Holmes recalled, “I saw that and thought ‘I’m not going to be here for five years. And then I finished my freshman year and I thought ‘I’m about to finish in five years.” Holmes, a computer engineering major, decided to take 12 credits every semester to better balance her challenging curriculum with the social opportunities Howard had to offer—from events, to social and service organizations such as Jewels, Inc. a mentoring program she was an active member of throughout college. Twelve credits per semester, however, wouldn’t help her accrue the 126 she needed to graduate within four years. Although Holmes had realized she wouldn’t be graduating with the class, watching her friends and peers prepare for their long-awaited commencement without her was emotional for her. “Last year, I cried on graduation day,” Holmes said. “But if I had graduated last year I wouldn’t have the opportunities I have now. Looking back, I wouldn’t have done it differently.”

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Lifestyle

Cheerios ad sparks debate on interracial relationships

TERI AND CARL DASHFIELD The recent controversy over the new Cheerios commercial which features an interracial couple and their biracial daughter’s concern for her father’s heart health has stirred up a lot of emotion, causing the question to be asked, has society become more accepting of interracial relationships now than years before or is it still just as taboo?“I loved it (the commercial) and thought it was so cute,” said Teri Dashfield, of Ohio. “But the first thing I thought, besides how cute it was, is that Cheerios is going to get some flack. There are going to be some narrow-minded people being ugly. People need to get over it. It is adorable and it represents the changing face of our nation. I’m very happy Cheerios has not backed down.”

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Business

Tech Tips: Ways to improve online life, save money

by Anick JesdanunAP Technology Writer NEW YORK (AP) — As the year began, I decided I would get serious about digital cleanup — to save money and improve my online life. For a while, I had been putting off tasks such as backing up computer files and canceling the premium cable channels I never watch. Usually, I’d remember to do something while riding the bus, then soon forget. It took some discipline over a few months to get my digital life in order. As a result, I’m due to save more than $2,000 a year, money I can spend on a nice vacation.

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Entertainment

Carnegie Mellon cheers ‘bumper crop’ of Tonys

CMU Alumni Patina Miller and Billy Porter pose with their awards in the press room at the 67th Annual Tony Awards, in New York, June 9,(Photo by Charles Sykes/Invision/AP) by Mark KennedyAP Drama Writer NEW YORK (AP) — There was plenty of applause heard during the Tony Awards — and perhaps no place louder than from as far away as Pittsburgh. Six alumni from Carnegie Mellon University took home Tonys in five categories, a glittery haul that was both a school record and a huge source of pride for a theater department that turns 100 next year. Billy Porter, Patina Miller and Judith Light each took home acting Tonys, while Ann Roth got one for best costume design, and partners Jules Fisher and Peggy Eisenhauer won for best lighting design of a play. “We’ve had a bumper crop,” said Peter Cooke, head of the university’s school of drama. “I’m just delighted that they received rewards from their peers. It was just a terrific night.”

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Opinion

Why isn’t there Straight Pride month?

by LZ Granderson (CNN) — On North Halsted Street, between Buckingham and Roscoe in Chicago, a monument stands with a plaque in honor of a brilliant thinker who is as responsible for the way we live our lives today as any person who has ever lived. His name is Alan Turing, a Brit, and among his many credits and accolades, many historians refer to him as “the father of computer science.” When Time magazine listed him among its 100 most influential people of the 20th century, it said “that everyone who taps at a keyboard, opening a spreadsheet or a word-processing program, is working on an incarnation of a Turing machine.” A pretty high honor to say the least. And yet in 1952, while filing a robbery report with the police, Turing — the man whose algorithms cracked the Enigma code used by the Nazis in World War II — found himself arrested at his home in England. His crime? Being gay.