What comes now for NFL after tumultuous season?

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Montgomery said he got six concussions in one season alone, and others along the way, including one that knocked him out cold a few days before playing for the Eagles in the NFC title game at the end of the 1980 season.

“I know one thing: Back then, it didn’t make any difference. They gave you smelling salts and then, after that, you went back in,” Montgomery said. “I have headaches all the time. That’s why I say my wife is always messing with me when I have outbursts, saying, ‘You’ve been hit too many times upside the head.'”

Montgomery laughed for a moment. Then he rubbed his forehead and continued talking, mentioning former teammate and friend Andre Waters and opponent Dave Duerson. Both committed suicide; researchers studied their brain tissue and found signs of chronic traumatic encephalopathy, or CTE, a degenerative disease also found in boxers and often linked with repeated blows to the head. Former star linebacker Junior Seau, who shot himself in May, also was found to have CTE. Baltimore’s starting center on Sunday, Matt Birk, has pledged to donate his brain for study when he dies.

“It’s a serious thing,” Montgomery said. “It’s scary.”

When the President of the United States refers to fans perhaps having a guilty conscience when watching a game and parents thinking twice before allowing a child to play — as Barack Obama did in a recent interview with The New Republic — it sends a strong signal about what confronts the NFL today.

“If I was worried about my health,” 49ers quarterback Colin Kaepernick said, “I wouldn’t be playing football.”

So the league must figure out how to deal with “walking a fine line,” as 49ers CEO Jed York described it: The two-sided task of making the game safer, which Commissioner Roger Goodell acknowledges is imperative, while not making it “too safe,” thereby diminishing the popularity of an enterprise that is violent by its very nature.

“There’s no question that that is a bit of a conundrum. But to me, we’ve got to place more weight on player safety,” New York Giants co-owner John Mara said. “The rules changes that we’ve implemented over the past five or six years have not made the game any less exciting. If anything, the game is as exciting as ever, and I strongly believe that we can make additional improvements in the rules and we’re not going to lose anything in terms of excitement on the field.”

Ravens owner Steve Bisciotti is convinced the NFL will strike the proper balance.

“What did they do for boxing when they made them go from 6-ounce, to 8-ounce to 12-ounce gloves or whatever? Did it change boxing? Not really,” Bisciotti said. “I believe that with every change, there will be a correction. … And I believe that we as a league and the (players’ union) will agree on things that don’t take football out of football.”

In a series of moves that began shortly after Goodell was grilled at a congressional hearing, the league has changed concussion return-to-play guidelines, adjusted rules for kickoffs — and floated the idea of eliminating them altogether — stepped up punishment of illegal hits, and stopped arguing against the players’ wish for independent neurology specialists on the sidelines during games.

Even if there are some players who in one breath worry about whether their health is imperiled, and in the next say, “We’re basically going to be playing two-hand touch in a while” — Baltimore nose tackle Terrence Cody’s words this week — the head of their union points out that prudence and popularity do not have to be mutually exclusive.

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