Daily Archive: October 24, 2012

Metro

Anti-Violence Coalition formed

When Latula Love, of the Hazelwood African-American Forum, lost his son, grandson, granddaughter and two nephews to street violence, he said there was no one to turn to. Now he wants to make sure there is. “When I needed help, there was none,” he said. “Violence not only affects families, it affects generations of families, and it needs to stop.” NEW DIRECTION—As Treasurer Vanessa Fancher looks on, Secretary Khalid Raheem announces the formation of the Community Coalition for Violence Prevention and Intervention. (Photo by Gail Manker) Over the last few months, Love and members of a number of community groups have been meeting to find a new model to combat Black-on-Black violence. The first step in that effort came this week when they announced the formation of a new coalition to do just that on a county-wide basis.

Metro

Community Calendar

Facing Violence Among Men OCT. 25—The YWCA of Greater Pittsburgh will host a Facing Violence Among Men from 5:30-7:30 p.m. at the Thelma Lovett YMCA, 2114 Centre Ave., Hill District. This is an interactive discussion on how mentoring a boy or young man can reduce violence and promote community leadership. Several speakers will be on hand. This is part of the YWCA’s Week Without Violence series. For more information, visit http://www.ywcapgh.org.

Metro

Garfield shooters sought

The shooting death of a 20-year-old in Garfield, last Sunday, is the latest death in Allegheny County, bringing the total thus far for the year to 85 homicides, more than last year’s total of 73 and 15 away from 2010’s total of 100. Rudolph Freeman, 20 of McKees Rocks, was killed in the evening of Oct. 21 while visiting friends at a home on Mossfield Street in Garfield. After leaving to meet someone, neighbors heard shots and Freeman was found on the back patio of the home. Freeman was pronounced dead on the scene with multiple gunshot wounds to the chest and torso.

Metro

Afterschool programs join forces

A 2008 Northeastern University study found a sharp increase in homicides involving African-American youth, both as victims and perpetrators, between 2000 and 2007. The study found that risk spiked during the afterschool hours, indicating that afterschool hours are a peak time for juvenile crime for youth who do not have access to afterschool programs. For the past three years the Greater Pittsburgh Afterschool Consortium has been coming together to provide a safe haven for area youth. On Oct. 18 they hosted the 3rd Annual “Playing for Unity” event at Manchester Youth Development Center, which brought together children in afterschool programs across Allegheny and Beaver Counties.

Metro

Community responds to youth football game shootings

Over the past week, several community organizations and leaders held a variety of events in response to the Oct. 13 shooting at a youth football game in East Liberty. One person was killed and two others were injured at the homecoming game for the East End Raiders peewee football team at the Obama International Studies Academy field. “Unfortunately for the citizens of Metropolitan Pittsburgh news reports on shootings and killings have become far too common,” said Tim Stevens, Black Political Empowerment Project chairman and Coalition Against Violence co-convener in a statement on Oct. 16. “When children, their parents, grandparents, relatives and friends can’t even attend a peewee football game we have indeed come a long way in the wrong direction.”

UlishCarterbox

Opinion

GOP still running voter ID ads

Several people have called to complain about ads the Pennsylvania Department of State is running stating that voters need their ID in order to vote. The Voter ID law was delayed by the courts, which should have led to all the ads being pulled. But the department hasn’t pulled them. This is very confusing to people. Well, let me clear it up. No, you don’t have to have your ID at the polling place this election, but it will be needed for all other elections after this one. This election should be the same as all other elections in the past.

Opinion

Death of affirmative action

(NNPA)—“We expect that 25 years from now, the use of racial preferences will no longer be necessary.” —Justice Sandra Day O’ Connor, 2003. The U.S. Supreme Court recently heard arguments regarding a longstanding racial controversy. So, in the traditional form of our time in America, the Black descendants of slaves will still be losers when the Fisher v. University of Texas case decision is handed down. The court’s decision will affect relatively few students at Texas, which admits most students through a system that doesn’t factor in race. But a broad Supreme Court ruling will roll back affirmative action and be an earthquake at other campuses, and institutions that will mark the death of affirmative actions that use race toward instituting their plans and policies.