Daily Archive: October 17, 2012

Metro

Clinton: We are getting shafted on Shale training

With the boom in natural gas mining, and with Black unemployment nearly twice that of Whites, African American Workers Union founder Calvin Clinton saw an opportunity to provide training for unemployed Blacks and low-income residents to take advantage of jobs drilling at the Marcellus Shale. CALVIN CLINTON Since his union has previously provided training for 13 other construction-related skilled trades, under the auspices of the US Department of Labor, he thought getting the certification for two new training programs would be routine. It has not, and Clinton believes the Pennsylvania Bureau of Labor and Industry’s State Apprenticeship and Training Council is actively quashing his application.

Metro

Jackson urges Obama vote at Mt. Ararat

Joined by state local and federal representatives, Rev. Jesse Jackson lent his signature eloquence to a breakfast rally to bolster the vote for President Barack Obama at Mt. Ararat Baptist Church in East Liberty. GET OUT THE VOTE—Rev. Jesse Jackson urges people to mobilize for President Obama and against voter suppression during a breakfast meeting at Mt. Ararat Baptist Church in East Liberty. (Photo by J.L. Martello) In addition to elected officials, the event was attended by upwards of 150 individuals representing various churches, community activist groups and labor unions. The event was coordinated by the One Pittsburgh coalition, which includes among others the United Steelworkers, Sierra Club, Just Harvest and the NAACP of Pittsburgh.

Metro

Community Calendar

School Anniversary OCT. 18—The Westinghouse High School Alumni Committee will host the Alumni Day and 100th Anniversary Celebration of Westinghouse High School from 11 a.m.-1 p.m. at 1101 N. Murtland St., Homewood. There will be alumni art, music and other memorabilia on display in the front lobby. A pep rally will follow the event. For more information, call Valeria Williams at 412-795-4016.

National

This Week in Black History

Week of October 17-23 October 17 1720—Jupiter Hammon, the first Black American poet, is born in slavery. He was a Calvinist and self-educated writer. PRINCE HALL 1787—Led by Black Mason Prince Hall, free Boston Blacks petition the Massachusetts legislature for equal school facilities for African-American children. In addition to spreading Freemasonry among Blacks, Hall became the most prominent Black leader of the period. For reasons which are not entirely clear, records show there were at least 21 men named “Prince Hall” living in Massachusetts at the time.

National

Specter dies as Congress is at its most polarized

by Marc Levy HARRISBURG, Pa. (AP) —Arlen Specter, who spent much of his pugnacious 30-year career in the U.S. Senate warning of the dangers of political intolerance, lost a battle with non-Hodgkin lymphoma at a time when Congress is more politically polarized than anyone serving there—or living in America—can remember. LAST CAMPAIGN—President Barack Obama arrives at a fundraising event September 15, 2009 for Sen. Arlen Specter, D-Pa., at the Pennsylvania Convention Center in Philadelphia. (AP Photo/Charles Dharapak, File) Specter, who died Sunday, is remembered as one of Congress’ best-known moderates.

National

High court won’t block early voting in Ohio 

WASHINGTON (AP)—The Supreme Court is siding with Democrats in refusing to block early voting in the battleground state of Ohio. The court on Tuesday refused a Republican request to get involved in a dispute over early voting in the state on the three days before Election Day.

UlishCarterbox

Opinion

Kudos to all Voter ID warriors

Kudos go out to all the people who just didn’t sit on their butts and cry when the Pennsylvania House and Senate passed the Voter ID law. They all could have accepted the defeated attitude of the glass is half empty, by saying it’s the law and there’s nothing we can do about it. But they fought it. The ACLU, state NAACP and others locally and across the state fought. First by challenging the law in court. And even though in the long run they lost, they won for this election, which the law was geared to in the first place. The object was to get President Obama out of office.

Opinion

Steps to counter voter suppression

(NNPA)—Hopefully by now you have heard a thing or two about efforts on the part of the Republicans to suppress the votes of minorities, youth, the elderly, union members and many veterans. The plot is fairly simple: make it especially difficult to vote by setting up all sort of systems of identification in the name of avoiding alleged voter fraud. The fact that voter fraud has not been a major issue in the U.S. in recent memory is irrelevant for the Republicans since their principal objective is to decrease the potential turnout on the part of voters likely to go with Democratic candidates.

Opinion

Healthcare is a civil right

(NNPA)—Our Constitution offers us “life, liberty and the pursuit of happiness,” but we can’t pursue anything if we are unhealthy. Yet, health disparities in the United States are a fact of life. African-Americans have shorter lives than Whites for three reasons. One has to do with income and poverty. Poor people [27 percent of African-Americans are poor, compared to about 10 percent of Whites] have less money and less access, often having to make a choice between medical treatment, food to eat, prescription drugs and rent.