Daily Archive: September 5, 2012

Metro

Burgess gives Larimer development presentation to packed house

Complete with PowerPoint presentations from the Urban Redevelopment Authority, The Housing Authority of the City of Pittsburgh and developer Keith B. Keys, Pittsburgh Councilman Rev. Ricky Burgess asked for community input and support for a plan to begin rebuilding Larimer. “My main point—what I want, is what the residents want,” he said. “The people who live here should decide on this plan and benefit from this plan.” YOU TELL ME—Pittsburgh Councilman Rev. Ricky Burgess tells an audience of Larimer residents that they should guide and benefit from a proposed 40-unit, mixed-income housing development. (Photo by J.L. Martello.) Burgess continued to stress that point as 200 or so residents enjoyed the catered chicken, meatballs, salads, desserts and beverages he provided, and watched the presentations.

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Metro

59 of 72 homicides Black lives…August the most DEADLY month

The month of August has been the most deadly month this year, with 14 homicides, bringing the total to 72. Only eight full months into the year and 2012’s total is only one away from 2011’s complete total of 73 homicides. But yet again, the saddest part is that most of the list is compiled of young Black men 25 years old and under, some not even given a chance to see their 18th birthday, such as Emery Lamberto, just 15, and Harold Young, 17.

Metro

Gibson foundation prepares students for sports careers

High school students in the Pittsburgh Public School District could find themselves more engaged in their studies this year thanks to a new career and technical education program. The new curriculum, created through a partnership between the Josh Gibson Foundation and Duquesne University, will introduce high school students to different career opportunities in sports, beyond the professional athlete track. SEAN GIBSON “So many kids want to be professional athletes and there’s nothing wrong with that, but there’s very few kids who are going to be able to make it to the professional level. But if you like sports, there’s so many opportunities that they have a better chance of becoming successful in then becoming an athlete,” said Sean Gibson, director of the Josh Gibson Foundation. “I’m not telling them to give up on their dreams, but you still have to have a plan B.”

Metro

Mother finds no justice in son’s death

“Life is Real” is the motto Tiffany Bowie, who wears a necklace with her son’s picture on it, keeps with her as a reminder of her son. She thought that by moving her son from the city of Pittsburgh to the family oriented community of Aliquippa, she would be giving him a better life and an opportunity to excel at football, a sport he enjoyed. Never did she expect she would face the greatest loss of her life—her 18-year-old son. MOTHERS’ LOVE—Tiffany Bowie holds the picture of her late son, Robert M. Hall Jr. He was tragically gunned down in Aliquippa on Dec. 28, 2010. (Photo by Rossano Stewart) Robert Melvin Hall Jr., Bowie’s son had gotten mixed up with the wrong crowd. He had been shot at several times, but never hit, until one night. On Dec. 28, 2010, Hall was gunned down while riding with friends. And on Jan. 5, 2011, Bowie said her final goodbye to her only son. Now, almost two years later, the three suspects thought to have been responsible are walking away free and Bowie feels as if she has been robbed of any justice.

Metro

One Vision One Life killed

Beset by budget problems and the death of arguably its most effective employee, the street violence intervention program One Vision One Life was forced to close after eight years of advocacy. It begun in 2003 as an initiative of Allegheny County’s Department of Human Service, funded through federal grants, the program was the brainchild of Richard Garland, a former gang member from Philadelphia who sought to use other former gang members to quell street-level disputes before they escalated into shootings. RICHARD GARLAND

Metro

Community Calendar

Women’s Walk SEPT. 8—The Northside Coalition for Fair Housing will host the 5th Annual Women’s Walk for a Peaceful Community from 10 a.m.-1 p.m. at the Pittsburgh Project, 2801 N. Charles St., North Side. The day will consist of a 2-mile walk through the North Side neighborhoods to West Park, where the walk will end with local speakers addressing the peace council. The special guest will be poet and author Patricia Smith, along with a free concert by the Grammy winning hip-hop group Arrested Development. Registration is requested. For more information, call 412-321-5527 or visit http://www.wowmenswalk.org.

International

Zimbabwe’s capital ‘world’s 4th worst to live in’

HARARE, Zimbabwe (AP)—An independent research group says Zimbabwe’s capital is the world’s fourth-worst city to live in, based on daily hardships and political risk. Cities in war zones are excluded from the “livability” index. The British-based Economist Intelligence Unit put Harare 137th out of 140 cities surveyed and gave it a 39.4 rating on a scale to 100 for ideal urban conditions. In its report available Thursday, Harare ranked marginally better than Lagos in Nigeria, Port Moresby in Papua New Guinea and Dhaka, Bangladesh. HEROES DAY—Zimbabwe’s Prime Minister Morgan Tsvangirai, left, with Zimbabwean President Robert Mugabe, during the country’s Heroes Day Commemorations, in Harare, Aug. 13. Zimbabwe’s president says his party’s symbol of a raised fist was used to fight colonial-era white rule and is not a gesture of violence toward fellow Zimbabweans. (AP Photo/Tsvangirayi Mukwazhi)

International

France offers to pick up tab for young hires

by Sarah DiLorenzo PARIS (AP)—The French government wants companies to hire young people so much that it’s offering to pick up the tab. The new Socialist president, Francois Hollande, told his Cabinet Wednesday that he wants to wage a war on unemployment and unveiled a plan for the government to pay most of the salaries of tens of thousands of young people hired next year. Unemployment in France is 10 percent, but nearly 23 percent for those under the age of 25. That’s an imbalance that many European countries are struggling with: In Spain, youth unemployment is over 52 percent; it’s 34 percent in Italy.

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National

This Week In Black History

For the Week of September 5-11 September 5 1859—The first novel written by a Black woman is published in the United States. The woman was Harriet Wilson and the novel was entitled “Our Nig: Or Sketches from the Life of a Free Black.” The novel was lost for years until reprinted with a critical essay by Black scholar Henry Louis Gates in 1982. The novel, which may have been a bit autobiographical, centers on the life of “Frada”—a Black indentured servant who was physically and emotionally abused by her owners. THADDEUS STEVENS

National

Obama’s re-election road: Hope and a hard climb

by Ben FellerAP White House Correspondent WASHINGTON (AP)—People remember the hope and the history. For him or against him, they picture candidate Barack Obama as the one who stood on stage in a football stadium in Denver and accepted the Democratic presidential nomination by declaring “It’s time for us to change America.” Forgotten, it seems, is what Obama said when he actually won. TIME TO CHANGE AMERICA—In this Aug. 28, 2008 photo Democratic presidential nominee, Sen. Barack Obama, D-Ill., left, his wife, Michelle, right, are joined by daughters Malia and Sasha, after his nomination acceptance speech at the Democratic National Convention in Denver. (AP Photo/Charlie Neibergall, File)