Daily Archive: August 1, 2012

Metro

AIDS in America: Blacks hit hardest

Last week, more than 24,000 participants from 183 countries converged in Washington, D.C., for the 19th International AIDS Conference. While the conference focused on the AIDS epidemic in countries around the globe, the message for Americans was clear. The Black community is the group hit hardest by the epidemic in the United States. WE REMEMBER—Hilary Beard reads a list of names from the AIDS Memorial Quilt of those who have passed, as Duane Cramer comforts her. (Photo by Freddie Allen/NNPA) While African-Americans make up only 14 percent of the population, they account for nearly 50 percent of those infected with HIV. But despite these statistics, the epidemic continues to be stigmatized and ignored in the Black community.

NationalMall

Metro

Risky behavior not tied to HIV increase in Black gay men

Among Black males in 2010, an estimated 70 percent of diagnosed HIV infections were attributed to Men having Sex with Men (MSM). Regardless of race, MSM have historically bore the brunt of the HIV/AIDS epidemic. But new studies presented at the 19th International AIDS Conference in Washington, D.C., revealed that Black MSM, while at a far greater risk for contracting HIV than any other American demographic, are less likely to engage in “risk behaviors.” NATIONAL MALL—The AIDS Memorial Quilt is made up of panels representing those who have died due to AIDS-related causes. The quilt was displayed on the National Mall, July 23. (Photo by Freddie Allen/NNPA) Findings from the Center for Disease Control and Prevention show Black MSM have a one-in-four chance of contracting HIV by the age of 25 and a six-in-ten chance of contracting the virus by age 40. The CDC also found that between 2006 and 2009, new infections among Black MSM between the ages of 13 and 29 rose by 48 percent.

Metro

Freedom Riders return to Pa. Capitol steps for Voter ID rally

by Joby Brown (HARRISBURG)—More than 1,000 demonstrators descended on the Capitol steps in Harrisburg to protest the Voter ID law that could significantly impact the 2012 Presidential election. Concerned citizens from all over Pennsylvania and other parts of the nation came to the state capital in busses, cars and by plane. One hundred citizens from Beaver, Lawrence and Westmoreland Counties travelled to the Capitol on busses sponsored by the Beaver County NAACP, SEIU, Beaver County Commissioner Joe Spanik and Henry T. Berry. RALLY ON CAPITOL STEPS—Pennsylvania NAACP President Jerry Mondesire rallies crowd on steps of Capitol. (Photo by Miriam Brown) The Pa. NAACP says if upheld, this law will disenfranchise more than a million Pennsylvania voters, including 100,000 in Allegheny County, 200,000 in Philadelphia, 10,000 in Beaver County, 7,000 in Lawrence County and 580,000 senior citizens, including a highly disproportionate number of African-Americans and other minorities.

Metro

Black male success model grant to Robert Morris

With an unemployment rate of more than 14 percent for African-Americans, almost twice the national average, and reports that Black men are far less likely to graduate from high school or even attend college, Robert Morris University is committed to turning around the statistics. REX CRAWLEY With a $900,000 grant from the Heinz Endowment, the university announced they will create the RMU Research Center on Black Male Educational Student Success to identify the factors of successful African-American males to develop a model for educational achievement that can be emulated.

Metro

Black school directors react to teacher cuts

When the Pittsburgh School Board voted to lay off nearly 300 teachers July 25, the vote was a unanimous 6-0, even if directors Mark Brentley, Sharene Shealey and Regina Holley had attended it would not have made a difference. The furloughs, it is hoped, will save the district more than $42 million through the next two years. Even so, Brentley said the cuts disproportionally target Black students and he would have voted against them. SHARENE SHEALEY “Knowing I was going to be out of town at the National Urban League convention, I tried to vote in advance at the previous meeting,” said Brentley. “I’d have voted no had I been there because decisions and recommendations are being made on race, period.”

National

This Week In Black History

For the Week of August 1-7 August 1 1619—This is possibly the day that the history of Blacks in America begins. However, no one knows for sure the exact day that the ship arrived in Jamestown, Va., carrying at least 20 Africans who were sold as indentured servants. There is some authority that the ship arrived in late August. All that appears certain is that the month was August and the year was 1619—the beginning of Black history in America.

National

Farrakhan leads peacemaking effort in the streets of Chicago

by A. M. MuhammadFor New Pittsburgh Courier CHICAGO (NNPA)— Imagine sitting on your porch or apartment stoop and a caravan of several Black Chevy Suburbans and Hummers roll up. A security detail and group of 40 to 50 Black men in suits walks down your block. As the group gets closer and closer, some men are carrying copies of The Final Call newspaper. ‘TAKIN’ IT TO THE STREETS’

Opinion

Title IX isn’t just about sports

(NNPA)—No person in the United States shall, on the basis of sex, be excluded from participation in, be denied the benefits of, or be subjected to discrimination under any education program or activity receiving federal financial assistance.”—Title IX

Opinion

Valuing some lives over others

(NNPA)—The national support for the victims of the recent Colorado shootings is great. However, if we believe in the equivalency of life, what about the lives of young men in Chicago, where there have been more deaths than in Afghanistan so far this year. While the hospitals in Aurora say they will cover hospital bills for those without insurance (one in three in Colorado), who will cover bills for those who are hospitalized after a drive-by? We mourn some deaths and ignore others, which suggests that some life is valued and some life is cheap.