Daily Archive: June 8, 2012

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Metro

Hill promotes entrepreneurship

Josh Linkner knows a little about entrepreneurship because as the managing partner in Detroit Venture Partners, he bets on them all the time as part of an effort to rebuild Detroit via the growth of indigenous businesses. On June 2 he brought his expertise to the Hill District as the keynote speaker for the Make It Happen conference at the Kaufmann Center’s Hillman Auditorium and urged residents to do the same. FREDERICK DOUGLASCosmos Technologies “Pittsburgh and Detroit both have histories of innovation and entrepreneurship, but they both got away from that,” he said. “Today, Pittsburgh has the opportunity to become a vibrant beacon of hope.”

National

AME Bishop H. Hartford Brookins, Civil Rights activist, dies at 86

(NNPA)—Hamel Hartford Brookins, a bishop for 30 years of the African Methodist Episcopal Church and a veteran civil rights activist, died on May 22 in Los Angeles, Calif. He was 86. Bishop Hamel Hartford Brookins (AP Photo) Brookins, the son of sharecroppers, helped implement school desegregation in Kansas following the landmark Supreme Court ruling in Brown v. Topeka Board of Education, was one of the architects of Operation PUSH with Rev. Jesse Jackson and played a key role in the campaign of Tom Bradley to become the first African American mayor of Los Angeles.

National

Gov. Christie surprised at rejection of gay, Black, Republican, N.J. Supreme Court nominee

by Zenitha PrinceFor New Pittsburgh Courier (NNPA)—New Jersey Gov. Chris Christie, R, blamed politics for the state senate committee rejection of New Jersey Supreme Court nominee Bruce Harris, the first openly gay and third African-American nominee to the state’s high court. QUESTIONED—Bruce Harris, 61, Gov. Chris Christie’s gay Black Republican nominee to the New Jersey Supreme Court, answers a question May 31, as the Senate Judiciary panel considers his nomination. (AP Photo/Mel Evans)

Metro

Greenwood heads ‘Tee Up For Babies Charity Golf Outing’

For more than 20 years the Healthy Start program has been striving to reduce infant mortality and the low birth weight of babies. Presently, the national Healthy Start program serves 104 projects in 39 states, the District of Columbia and Puerto Rico. Since its inception, the Pittsburgh Allegheny County region has been an essential part of the project, expanding into Fayette County in 2000. GOLFING FOR A CAUSE—Former Steelers Mike Wagner, Craig Bingham, Matt Bahr, Rocky Bleier, Andy Russell, J.T. Thomas, L.C. Greenwood, Todd Kalis and Justin Hartwig stand with Healthy Start staff Mitch Coates (second from last), as the team prepares to tee off. Funded in part by the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Health Resources and Services Administration, and Maternal and Child Health Bureau, as executive director, of the local Healthy Start entities, Cheryl Squire Flint and her staff are always thinking of creative fundraising events. “Even though our federal grant continues, the agency has needs that it does not cover,” she explained, citing cribs and car seats as a few items.

Metro

Teacher firing debate continues

On May 30, A+ Schools Director Carey Harris sent out an email urging citizens to let their voices be heard in the current Pittsburgh Public School District debate over “teacher effectiveness.” As the district faces the furloughs of 400 of its teachers, A+ Schools, an independent community advocate for improvement in student achievement, has joined the district in asking that “teacher effectiveness” be factored into furlough decisions, instead of the current furlough selection method based on seniority.

National

The Black roots of Memorial Day

by Valencia MohammedFor New Pittsburgh Courier (NNPA)—Memorial Day was originally known as Decoration Day. It is believed to have been initially proclaimed in 1868 to commemorate fallen Union and Confederate soldiers. The roots of the Memorial Day holiday, however, reach further back to Black South Carolina, where newly freed slaves expressed gratitude for the Yankee invasion that became the Civil War. SOLEMN OBSERVANCE—President Barack Obama and first lady Michelle Obama at the Vietnam Memorial on the National Mall on May 28. (AP Photo/Pablo Martinez Monsivais)

National

Rhode Island cellist edges out African American finalists to win Miss USA crown

LAS VEGAS (AP)—The nation’s newest Miss USA winner is a Rhode Island cellist who describes herself as a nerd and aspires to be more like Hollywood icon Audrey Hepburn. Olivia Culpo shares Hepburn’s European heritage and dark brown hair and soon they will share something else. Culpo said after winning her crown Sunday night that she plans to go to Tiffany & Co. in New York and recreate Hepburn’s iconic opening scene from “Breakfast at Tiffany’s.” TOP FIVE—The five top five finalists, from left, Miss Ohio, Miss Maryland, Miss Rhode Island, Miss Nevada and Miss Georgia stand together during the 2012 Miss USA pageant, June 3, in Las Vegas. (AP Photo/Julie Jacobson) Rounding out the top five contestants, which included two African-Americans, were first runner-up Nana Meriwether of Maryland, second runner-up Audrey Bolte of Ohio, third runner-up Jade Kelsall of Nevada and fourth runner-up Jasmyn Wilkins of Georgia.

National

U.S. Army toughens enlistment, re-enlistment requirement

by Alexis TaylorFor New Pittsburgh Courier (NNPA)—The Army has become significantly more selective about who it wants to serve as soldiers. Last week’s announcement of tougher enlistment and re-enlistment requirements comes just weeks after an April announcement of tighter restrictions on tattoos, hair, and makeup came in April.