Daily Archive: April 20, 2012

Metro

PNC helps Just Harvest tax clients

In an effort to help low-income tax filers receive their refunds quickly and without paying exorbitant fees, PNC is offering clients of Just Harvest and Family Resources a free debit card which can be loaded with their refund amount and can then be used anywhere. TAX HELP—Brandon Bouchard, a volunteer tax preparer, assists Mary Jones, a clerical aid worker from the Hill District, with her taxes. (Photo by Rossano P. Stewart)

Sports

Jarvis makes push to play on Sundays

by Malik Vincent Like so many from the area, former Central Catholic and Kent State running back Eugene Jarvis is making a push to play football, professionally. Sure, he stands at a very compact 5-foot-6. And yes, Jarvis has battled injury all throughout his career as a Golden Flash. HOPING TO GO PRO—Eugene Jarvis, a four-year letterman at Kent State and former Central Catholic runningback carries the ball during a game. (Photo courtesy of Kent State athletics) But he still maintains hope that there will be an opportunity for him to take to the gridiron on Sundays. “It’s easy to get deterred or discouraged whenever you’re doubted so heavily,” Jarvis said. “(NFL scouts) have said I’m too small and that I’ve suffered too many injuries. And I understand that it’s a business, so I have to keep striving.”

National

Groundbreaking NY journalist Gil Noble dies

NEW YORK (AP)—Gil Noble, the longtime host of WABC-TV’s groundbreaking public affairs program “Like It Is,” on which he interviewed such notables as Nelson Mandela, Muhammad Ali and Jesse Jackson, died April 12 at age 80. The television station announced the death of the Emmy Award-winning journalist, who had a debilitating stroke last summer, on its website. Gil Noble (AP Photo/WABC-TV) “Gil Noble’s life and work had a profound effect on our society and culture,” WABC-TV President and General Manager Dave Davis said. “His contributions are a part of history and will be remembered for years to come.”

Entertainment

Pittsburgh native stars in ‘Jesus Christ Superstar’

West End native Korey White is glad to be going back to his gospel and church roots with his role as James, one of the apostles in Pittsburgh Musical Theater’s production of “Jesus Christ Superstar” as part of the Broadway at the Byham series. “I had never seen Jesus Christ Superstar, but I kept hearing that it was one of the greatest shows and I wanted to be a part of it,” said White, 23, who graduated from Robert Morris University with a bachelor’s degree in Communication. SAVING SOULS—Korey White performs as James in “Jesus Christ Superstar.” (Photo by Patti Brahim) “This show deals with putting a lot of words into a small space. The music draws a lot of people together. It is a musically challenging and musically talented show.”

Health

Ifedirah VP Medicare at Gateway Health

Austin Ifedirah, MBA and DDS, has been named as Vice President, Medicare at Gateway Health Plan® and assumed the leadership role for the Gateway Health Plan Medicare Assured® HMO SNP product. Dr. Ifedirah reports directly to Michael Blackwood, President and CEO of Gateway and will become a member of the senior management team. AUSTIN IFEDIRAH

Metro

Community Calendar

Day Trip APRIL 19—Veterans Breakfast Club will host a Day Trip to Flight 93 Memorial and Chapel from 9 a.m.-4 p.m. at Shanksville, Pa. The cost is $89 and includes transportation, a continental breakfast and a lunch buffet. There will be several pick-up locations. For more information, call Chris at 412-881-4100, Todd at 412-623-9029 or email todd@veteransbreakfastclub.com.

National

Skittles joins food brands at center of tragedy

by Candace Choi NEW YORK (AP)—It could’ve been Starbursts, Twizzlers or Sour Patch Kids. But when Trayvon Martin was fatally shot, he happened to be carrying a bag of Skittles. The 17-year-old’s death at the hands of a neighborhood watchman in February ignited nationwide protests and heated debate about racial profiling and “Stand Your Ground” laws. YOUNG PROTESTER—Steven Johnson, 3, holds an enlarged banner of “Skittles” candy, as he joins Los Angeles community members at a “Justice for Trayvon Martin hoodie rally” last month. (AP Photo/Damian Dovarganes, File) For Mars Inc., the privately held company that owns Skittles, the tragedy presents another, more surreal dimension. Protestors carried bags of the chewy fruit-flavored candy while marching for the arrest of shooter George Zimmerman. Mourners pinned the bright red wrappers to their hooded sweatshirts at memorial services.

National

Newark mayor rescues neighbor from burning house

by Samantha Henry NEWARK, N.J. (AP)—The mayor of New Jersey’s largest city said Friday he thought he might die when he dashed through a burning, smoky kitchen to find and rescue a neighbor from her second-floor bedroom. “I felt fear. I really didn’t think we were going to get out of there,” Mayor Cory Booker, his burned right hand still bandaged, told a news conference in front of the boarded-up home. HERO—Newark Mayor Cory Booker talks about rescuing a neighbor April 13. (AP Photo/ Mel Evans) The 42-year-old mayor said it was very difficult to breathe as he looked for the woman, 47-year-old Zina Hodge, whose mother had screamed she was still trapped inside the burning house.

hopkendrickbox

Opinion

Why Preston instead of Gainey?

I am often asked the following two questions. First, after you read political literature and hear radio commercials, how do you separate the rhetoric from fact? The second most asked question is how do you make a determination between what is emotion and reality? My first response is you must begin to read and research who is a liar based on what they promise and can do, and then you must question what is their track record.

georgecurrybox

Opinion

Don Lemon favors reporters using the N-word

(NNPA)—Between the drama surrounding the arrest of George Zimmerman for the killing of 17-year-old Trayvon Martin in Sanford, Fla. and the White terrorists who killed two Blacks and injured five others in Tulsa, you may have missed the news about CNN Anchor Don Lemon, an African-American, defending journalists who use of the n-word while reporting on hate crimes.