Daily Archive: April 18, 2012

Metro

Hill grocery delayed again

After two groundbreakings, a year of delays, multiple changes in the contract management team, the dismissal of Executive Director Jules Matthews and her husband, Jason Matthews, the Hill House Economic Development Corporation finally seemed ready to build the promised SHOP ‘n SAVE grocery store the community has been waiting 20 years for. VACANT GROUND—Little appears to have been accomplished at the site of the Hill District’s future SHOP n’ SAVE. (Photo by J.L. Martello) Now, however, Hill House President and CEO Cheryl Hall-Russell said the project has hit another snag—a funding shortfall.

Metro

Mother pleads for witnesses in son’s death

For almost a year Tawnia Lomax has been dealing with an issue that far too many mothers in the African-American community have been going through—mourning the loss of a young son to Black on Black violence. The epidemic of Black on Black violence continues to touch families all over the country and is rapidly increasing, with no end in sight. In 2011, there were 73 homicides in Allegheny County, 58 of them Blacks, 51 of them Black men and what is even more alarming, many of them 30 years old and under. JAQUAY LOMAX But while Lomax continues to mourn her son’s death, she continues to fight even harder for justice and is asking for witnesses.

Metro

Preston, Gainey spar at Chamber debate

While neither candidate running for the state house 24th District seat called the other a liar, both incumbent state Rep. Joseph Preston Jr., D-East Liberty, and his Democrat Party-endorsed challenger Ed Gainey came close, taking every opportunity to rebut each other’s responses during the April 12 African American Chamber of Commerce of Western Pennsylvania Candidates Forum. JOSEPH PRESTON JR. and ED GAINEY After welcoming everyone and thanking the candidates and sponsor Comcast, Chamber President and CEO Doris Carson Wil­liams quickly turned the podium over to moderator and New Pittsburgh Courier Editor and Publisher Rod Doss, who began by asking for opening statements.

Metro

17 gun deaths spur call to action

According to data released at the beginning of April, 17 people have been killed in Allegheny County as a result of gun violence out of 21 total homicides so far this year. Of those 17, 13 were African-Americans and two others were the result of a shooting at the Western Psychiatric Institute and Clinic on March 8. REV. GLENN GRAYSON At a candlelight vigil on April 11 in front of Community of Reconciliation Church, gun reform activists used the one-month anniversary of the Western Psych shooting to shed light on the devastating impact illegal guns have on the Pittsburgh community.

Metro

Blacks see benefit of military service

A segment of the controversial Michael Moore documentary “Fahrenheit 9/11” shed light on military recruiting practices in low-income inner-city neighborhoods. Moore’s depiction showed military recruiters in the destitute looking town of Flint, Mich., enticing African-American youth from struggling families to enlist with the promise of a brighter future. SERVING OUR COUNTRY—On right: Keith Clark, an Air Force serviceman with two other enlistees. This segment from “Fahrenheit 9/11” has long been used as an example of misleading recruiting by the military in poor Black areas. These practices and military recruiting advertisements portraying the lack of opportunities for African-Americans have long been a sore subject in the Black community.

National

This Week In Black History

For the week of April 23-29 April 18 1818—Military leader Andrew Jackson (later president) leads the defeat of a force of Indians and Blacks at the Battle of Suwanee, bringing an end to the First Seminole War. The Seminoles had been the target of a government military campaign because they possessed lands, which Whites in Florida greatly desired, and because they had provided safe haven for escaped slaves. Indeed, Blacks such as John Horse would become major Seminole leaders. It would take at least two more major military campaigns before the Seminoles and their Black allies lost possession of those lands. SEMINOLE INDIAN

National

How to run a megachurch? With lots of help

by Lucas L Johnson II NASHVILLE, Tenn. (AP)—On just about any Sunday, as many as 10,000 people may fill the pews of The Potter’s House, Bishop T.D. Jakes’ Dallas-area megachurch. Believers say he has an uncanny way of connecting with his audience anyway. MEGA-PASTOR—In this Feb. 28, 2010 photo, Bishop T.D. Jakes shakes the hand of Texas Offenders Reentry Initiative graduates during service at The Potter’s House in Dallas. (AP Photo/Mike Fuentes, File) “It doesn’t matter about the size,” says Faith Johnson, a 13-year member. “It’s almost like nobody else is in that church, but me.” It takes some help for leaders of the largest megachurches and national ministries to make believers reject the idea that a smaller church is more intimate and personable. A big staff of associate pastors and elders is indispensable.

UlishCarterbox

Opinion

Rev. Blackwell is to be commended

There has been much criticism of the church and its role in today’s human rights struggle for Black people in comparison to the past. So I would like to commend Rev. Eugene Freedom Blackwell from the House of Manna Church in Homewood for his efforts in putting together the third annual “Prayer 4 Peace” march to stop the violence throughout the city and in Homewood in particular. The House of Manna Church is not a megachurch, but he and his wife were able to draw hundreds of people out to march to stop the killings. Even though many of the named people didn’t show up or speak, the most important people did. Those people are the grassroots people who are tired of all the killings and violence in their community, and they want someone to do something about bringing it to a halt.

Opinion

The complexion and complexities of war

(NNPA)—My readings and radio research recently revealed an interesting set of disturbing facts relative to the United States “war” in Afghanistan. Not withstanding the original purpose of killing Osama Bin Laden (done) and eradicating the presence of Al-Quaeda in Afghanistan (done), not to mention the colossal amount of money given to American defense contractors, our nation’s presence in Afghanistan seems to be a little more than military base maintenance.

Opinion

Questions for presidential candidates

(NNPA)—Now that former Sen. Rick Santorum has withdrawn from the Republican race for president, it is a foregone conclusion that former Massachusetts Gov. Mitt Romney will be the Republican nominee. To be sure, he still has to deal with the nuisance factor of Newt Gingrich, whose lack of money has not only torpedoed his campaign, but also one of his “think” tanks. Maybe Gingrich can find work, as he suggested that inner city youth do, by taking on some janitorial tasks. So it’s down to Romney and President Obama as opponents in November. The entertainment is over. Let’s get down to business.