Daily Archive: January 4, 2012

Opinion

Remembering Fred Shuttlesworth: The most courageous man in America

(NNPA)—“That Fred Shuttlesworth did not become a martyr was not for lack of trying… There was not a person in the civil rights movement who put himself in the position of being killed more often than Fred Shuttlesworth.” This quote from Andrew Manis, author of Rev. Fred Shuttlesworth’s biography “A Fire You Can’t Put Out,” sums up the truth about the man Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. once called “the most courageous civil rights fighter in the South.” When attackers planted a bomb near his parsonage at Bethel Baptist Church in Birmingham, Ala., on Christmas Day 1956 that tore apart the bedroom walls, floor, and even the mattress he was sleeping on but left him unhurt, Rev. Shuttlesworth took it as a sign that God would protect him as he kept on doing the work he was called to do. When he finally passed away on Oct. 5 at age 89, he had been granted a long, full life to keep following that calling.

Opinion

President Obama’s gift

Congressional Republicans have unintentionally given President Obama a gift with their inept and negative approach to creating public policy that meets the needs of the average American. Prior to the Christmas holiday, Congress was locked in a debate over whether or not to temporarily extend both tax cuts to middle class Americans and unemployment benefits. Republicans, as is becoming the norm, fought hard to set up road blocks so the legislation wouldn’t pass, saying they’d rather wait until the full Congress could pass a year-long extension, saying a temporary extension made no sense. Clearly the Republicans didn’t give much thought to what to American families would have to do to make ends meet while they waited what could be months for that full bill to be debated and passed.

Opinion

Guest editorial…Alarming growth in U.S. poverty

A new U.S. census report reveals the alarming news that nearly 1 in 2 Americans have fallen into poverty or have earnings that would classify them as low income. About 97.3 million Americans now fall into a low-income category, commonly defined as those earning between 100 and 199 percent of the poverty level, the census reports. Together with the 49.1 million who fall below the poverty line and are counted as poor, they number 146.4 million, or 48 percent of the U.S. population.

Entertainment

‘Through The Night’ tackles issues prevalent to Black men

The City Theatre will begin the 2012 season with a rousing one-man show that tells six connecting stories that shares the details of what it means to be a Black man in the United States of America in this day and age. DANIEL BEATY performs (Photos by J.L. Martello) “Through The Night,” which was penned, performed and directed by award-winning actor, writer, singer and composer Daniel Beaty, is part poetry and part soul, it presents a colorful range of characters ranging from a 10-year-old boy, an overweight bishop of a mega-church who is addicted to Ho snack cakes, a college student desperate to escape the projects and three more amazing characters. “Through the Night” showcases the dogged determination, hope and courage needed to make it through the obstacles that sometimes hinder life.

Entertainment

Josh White celebrates 66 years at Club Cafe

Celebrating his 66th year as a performer, Josh White Jr. continues the distinctive guitar playing of his legendary father. The Philadelphia Inquirer said of one of his performances: “The musical highlight of the evening was (White’s) set of sophisticated blues-based guitar playing and vocals. White has the harmonic finesse of a jazz performer, and his style is still one of the most recognizable and polished sounds in all folk music.” JOSH WHITE JR (Photo by J.L. Martello) White became, a “hit” literally over night at the age of four, by performing with his legendary father Josh White one night at New York’s famed “Café Society” night club (America’s first integrated nightclub) Josh attended New York’s famed Professional Children’s School, along with Elliott Gould, Sandra Dee, Leslie Uggams, Christopher Walken, and Marvin Hamlisch, who co-wrote Josh’s first solo recording for Decca in 1956, “See Saw.”

Entertainment

Arts & Culture Calendar

Thursday 5 Jazz Jam CJ’s Restaurant & Lounge presents “The Roger Humphries & RH Factor Jazz Jam Session” at 8 p.m. at 2901-2911 Penn Ave., Strip District. There will be live jazz and fun every Thursday night. Must be 30-years or older and there is a dress code that will be enforced. No tennis shoes, sweats or athletic gear. For more information, call 412-642-2377.

Business

New Year means new attitude

It is said that every second and moment in time provides a new chance in life and an opportunity to accomplish important tasks at hand. As the New Year begins, the same philosophy applies presenting another 12-month period to meet the challenges ahead. For a successful 2012, local leaders pin point community involvement, supporting Black businesses, networking and honing customer relations skills as a means to move forward. THE PRESIDENT SPEAKS—In town promoting his Jobs Bill, President Barak Obama addressed a mixed crowd of big and small businesses. President Obama cited entrepreneurship as the way to create new jobs for the future. During his visit to Pittsburgh seeking support for his American Jobs Act he said small business is a key factor. He specified that his mission is to create smart, forward-thinking ideas that will help the economy and workers adapt to changing times.

Business

Five bold economic predictions for Black America in 2012

by Mike Green 2012 may be the Year of the Urban Innovator. In 2011, many creative Black American entrepreneurs joined millions of risk-taking innovators racing into the startup frontier with dreams of developing their passions into the next big marketplace disruption. Yet, Black Americans face some unique economic challenges which, ironically, could compel their competitive spirits in the new year. Here are five bold predictions I believe will change the economic landscape for Black and urban America in 2012, contributing to an overall economic benefit for the nation.

Business

Black American income inequality

(NNPA)—As we begin 2012, the issue of “income inequality” is a matter of high importance for millions of Black Americans and others who struggle to improve their overall quality of life. The fact is that the contradiction of economic injustice for decades has had a devastating impact on Black people across America. Inequality and systematic racial discrimination in education, economics, and the environment have been so pervasive and institutionalized that too many of us have come to falsely believe that this situation is permanent without recourse to challenge and change it. This is again why the growing Occupy Wall Street movement should be of particular interests to African-Americans and Latino Americans who are the two groups that are most affected quantitatively by income inequality in America.