Daily Archive: November 16, 2011

National

This Week In Black History

For the week of Nov. 19-25 November 19 1985—Stepin Fetchit, the first major Black movie star, dies of pneumonia in Woodlawn Hills, Calif., at the age of 83. Fetchit (real name Lincoln Perry) was harshly criticized by most major Black organizations because he made his money playing a lazy, shiftless, easily frightened Black character during the 1940s and 1950s. However, the role, which appealed to many Whites and some Blacks, made him a millionaire. Stepin Fetchit

National

First Oscar of season goes to legendary actor James Earl Jones

by Sandy CohenAP Entertainment Writer LOS ANGELES (AP)—The first Academy Award of the season went to James Earl Jones Saturday night, capping a tumultuous week that saw the abrupt departure and rapid replacement of the Oscar show producer and host. The actor received an honorary Oscar for his long film career. Sir Ben Kingsley presented Jones with the award in London’s Wyndham Theater, where he is starring in “Driving Miss Daisy” with Vanessa Redgrave. LIFETIME ACHIEVEMENT AWARD—In this image taken Nov. 12. James Earl Jones, the veteran American actor, holds his lifetime achievement Oscar, in his dressing room at the Wyndham’s Theatre where he is starring in Driving Miss Daisy, in central London. (AP Photo/John Stillwell/PA)

National

Oprah’s OWN Network still struggling despite $12M cash injection

(NNPA)—Oprah Winfrey’s Own Network may have received a hearty $12 million cash infusion from its parent company, Discovery Communications, but the former daytime queen’s channel is still struggling. According to BET, OWN is struggling to make profits and the network’s newest shows, Rosie O’Donnell’s talk show and Oprah’s Life Class, are off to slow starts. OPRAH WINFREY

National

Dems celebrate union victory in Ohio

(NNPA)—The defeat of an anti-union law in Ohio is giving Democrats hope that organized labor could be a force in the 2012 elections. “What happened in Ohio matters everywhere,” AFL-CIO President Richard Trumka told the Associated Press. “I think the governors in the other states ought to take heed of this and if they don’t, they do so at their own peril.” THE PEOPLE SPEAK—Patricia Frost-Brooks, left, president of the Ohio Education Association, hugs Courtney Johnson, an 11th grade teacher from Ironton, Ohio, after Senate Bill 5 was defeated on Nov. 8, in Columbus, Ohio. (AP Photo/Tony Dejak)

National

Cain says God persuaded him to run for president

by Ray HenryAssociated Press Writer ATLANTA (AP)—Republican Herman Cain said God convinced him to enter the race for president, comparing himself to Moses: “‘You’ve got the wrong man, Lord. Are you sure?’” The Georgia business executive played up his faith Saturday after battling sexual harassment allegations for two weeks, trying to shift the conversation to religion, an issue vital to conservative Republicans, especially in the South.

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Opinion

America is replete with acts of immorality

This week’s column is the result of the tremendous coverage of the alleged incidents at Penn State University. The incidents were horrific because they involved a number of children. The news media across the nation have focused on it. Governor Corbett, religious groups, concerned people and the police use the word immoral. I agree wholeheartedly that those who sought to cover up these terrible acts committed—if not illegal acts—they were immoral acts.

Opinion

Is America’s criminal system just us?

More African-American men are in prison or jail, on probation or parole than were enslaved in 1850. One hundred and sixty-one years later, the biggest crime in America is a race-based criminal justice system where African-Americans are directly targeted and punished in much more aggressive ways than Whites. The U.S. justice system is a racist institution designed to marginalize and control millions of African-Americans. The system needs public scrutiny and disbandment.

Opinion

Smokin’ Joe has gone to heaven

(NNPA)—Joe Frazier, one of the greatest boxers of all time, has died from complications of liver cancer. He was 67 and lived his life to the fullest. He was one of the pioneers in the “Golden Years of Boxing”. What I liked most about Joe is that what you saw in him in the early 1960’s; you saw the same human traits up until his death. He was a good man, i.e. provider for his family (husband and father), philanthropist, role model for young men and a national treasurer/ambassador for our great nation. He certainly inspired me and had an affect on my molding. Young Black males were having a love affair with the sport of boxing. Prior to Joe, came the great Muhammad Ali. He won the 1960 Olympic gold medal and started defeating people with an incredible fight schedule and a remarkable personality. In 1964, Joe won the Olympic gold medal. Both he and Ali seemed odd for heavyweight fighters. Their speed and Joe’s height, 5’11”, seemed out of place. Joe would say, “Yes, I am usually shorter than my opponents but I have knocked all of them out.” Me and my crowd were in love with both of them.

Opinion

Guest editorial…Feds must probe Penn State scandal

A federal investigation is needed to investigate the allegations of child sexual abuse at Penn State. The state’s criminal investigation and an internal investigation by a newly formed investigative committee formed by the university’s board of trustees will not be enough. Penn State has one of the country’s largest and most loyal bases. The university’s football program has brought in millions of dollars in television broadcast rights, merchandising and more. It clearly appears that the success of the university’s football program hampered an investigation into allegations of child sex abuse. Rep. Patrick Meehan is right to call on the Department of Education to investigate the horrific allegations of abuse. Other congressman should join in the call for a federal investigation.

Opinion

American Christianity in Black and White

by Byron C. Douglas, Ph.D The expression of one’s faith is significantly influenced by cultural, historical, and racial factors. For example, the black worship experience in a great many churches is marked by gospel singing, rhythms and beats that are African influenced, and a call and response preaching and singing style that has African origins. Cultural, historical and racial factors may influence scriptural interpretations, and also one’s perspective on societal events.