Daily Archive: November 9, 2011

Opinion

Stop the violence against women

(NNPA)—The Fort Worth Alumnae Chapter of Delta Sigma Theta Sorority, Incorporated held its annual Sisterhood Luncheon last Saturday, and I was privileged and honored to be the keynote speaker. A cloud hovered over the luncheon, though, and the media was there to talk about it. Four Delta women have been raped in the Dallas Fort Worth area in the last year by a serial rapist who appears to be targeting women in their 50s and 60s. The rapes have caused such alarm that the national President of our sorority, Cynthia Butler McIntyre, has issued an alert, suggesting caution in displaying Delta identification on automobiles, and in wearing identifying t-shirts and sweaters.

Opinion

Income gap causes concern

Under our current tax system, the rich are getting richer while the middle class slides into poverty. Those who were poor before the recession are still poor and have little hope of changing their situations. We’re not talking about an income gap here, we’re talking about income inequality. In fact, the distribution of household income in the U.S. is more unequal today than in was three decades ago. According to report released by the Congressional Budget Office, after-tax income for America’s highest-income households—the richest 1 percent—saw a 275 percent growth from 1979 to 2007, while the poorest—20 percent—experienced only 18 percent growth. Those who sit in the middle experienced just under 40 percent growth.

Opinion

Editorial…‘Occupiers’ have more courage than Blacks

by A. Bruce Crawley During a brief conversation at an event last week two apparently well-educated African-Americans tried to carefully “explain” to me that President Barack Obama has no choice other than to ignore Black political issues because he wants of course to be re-elected and “there are more White voters than Black voters.” I was deeply disappointed by their easy acceptance of what has become a predictable pattern of second-class economic and political treatment for the Black community over the past few years. Not only did they seem willing to endure 16.2 percent Black unemployment levels (as long as it didn’t include the loss of their own jobs, I guess) but they were also apparently resigned to having four more years of the same if that’s what it will take to return the Obama family to the White House.

Opinion

Just say no to corporate greed

(NNPA)—Repatriation. It’s a word many schoolchildren probably haven’t yet learned to define or even seen very often outside of spelling bees. But when it comes to corporate taxes, repatriation is the cornerstone of an idea that has the potential to severely hurt millions of children and parents and widen the already historic and unconscionable gap between the rich and the poor. In its simplest definition, repatriation is bringing something back to its country of origin—returning it back home. One of the solutions to the jobs crisis being proposed by some of our Congressional leaders and lobbied for aggressively by some of the country’s richest corporations is a rehash of an old experiment: enacting a repatriation tax holiday that would temporarily allow U.S.-based multinational companies to bring home profits they currently hold overseas at a 5.25 percent tax rate, instead of the usual 35 percent corporate tax rate.

Entertainment

Scholarships given at TYGA concert

Grammy-nominated pop/rap artist TYGA, challenged youth as part of his ROAR (Reach Out and Represent) Youth Empowerment campaign at Brashear High School Oct. 29. “For me to come out here to Pittsburgh and talk to these kids is really important,” TYGA said. “They are excited at first, but then I think it really hits them when they go home and soak it in. GIVING BACK—TYGA giving out Certification of Appreciation to the student in attendance. “I know if one of my favorite artists came to high school and talked to me, it would really impact me. It would motivate me in a whole other light. As a celebrity, you have to realize that you have a certain talent and gift for a reason, and that’s really to help other people. A lot of people don’t realize that until later on in life or their career. I want to acknowledge that from the beginning of my career. This is my first time performing in Pittsburgh and I heard they have a lot of love for me out here, so I’m really excited to perform tonight.”

Entertainment

‘Sunday Best’ contestant scores big with debut CD

Love, honesty, praising God and embracing your purpose are the themes of gospel songstress Jessica Reedy’s debut album, “From the Heart,” which premiered at #1 on the Christian and Gospel iTunes Charts. “To God be the glory,” exclaimed Reedy. “I didn’t do anything. This was all God. I never thought this would happen. I wanted to be an R & B singer, but I didn’t doubt that when I became saved God humbled me. I was content that God had me in his hand.” JESSICA REEDY Reedy first stepped onto the scene as a season two contestant of BET’s “Sunday Best.” Although she didn’t end up bringing home the coveted winning title, she won something much more vital: She found her purpose.

Entertainment

Out & About with Brotha Ash

This week I visited the Galaxy Lounge & Entertainment Center in Homewood, CJ’s in the Strip District, Toro’s Bar in Garfield, Shadow Lounge in East Liberty, Brashear High School in Beechview and Kelly’s Bar in East Liberty My first stop was at Kelly’s Bar in East Liberty where everyone came out to have a great time on the last night with DJ Stephan on the 1’s and 2’s. Black and yellow was in full effect at the Halloween Party at the Galaxy Lounge & Entertainment Center in Homewood.

Entertainment

Arts & Culture Calendar

Thursday 10 Harris Exhibition The Carnegie Museum of Art presents “Teenie Harris, Photographer: An American Story” at the museum’s Heinz Galleries, 4400 Forbes Ave., Oakland. This is an exhibit about famous photographer Charles “Teenie” Harris and features thousands of his classic and historic photos. There will also be life size projections combined with a newly commissioned jazz soundtrack. The exhibit will run through April 7. For more information, visit http://www.cmoa.org.

Business

The future is in tomorrow

In the Oct. 5, issue of the New Pittsburgh Courier it was reported that there have been 60 homicides throughout Allegheny County this year. Forty-five have been African-American males. Concerned that any number is too many to lose to death, Grace Robinson, founder and board chair of Tomorrow’s Future, Inc., for the past 19 years has been doing her part to deter young people from a life of crime. GOOD JOB—Long-time supporter and entrepreneur Connie Portis, representing Auditor General Jack Wagner’s office (center) present Tomorrow’s Future Alumni certificates of achievement from her office. Marketia Gurley, Jason Rust, Dominque Thornill and Anton Wesley. “Tomorrow’s Future has been a safe haven for me. The program has opened my eyes. Grace shows by example. Tomorrow’s Future has exposed me to things I would not have experienced if I had not been a part of the program,” were the type of comments and compliments past participants proclaimed during the Salute of Tomorrow’s Future Alumni Program. More than 50 people were in attendance. Honorary chairs for the event were Paul Hennigan, president of Point Park University and Ruth Byrd-Smith, director of the Allegheny County M/W/DBE Department.

Business

Let consumers’ actions go beyond Bank Transfer Day

(NNPA)—Dissatisfaction with banking practices and policies have irritated, alienated and obligated customers in ways that did not seem fair at all. Although complaints ranged from mortgage lending and servicing to credit cards, the proverbial straw that broke was a new fee for use of debit cards. In a series of late September announcements, many major banks advised custo­mers of new fees. While some banks prefer­red monthly fees ranged from $3-$5, others would test or ‘assess’ fees per purchase. In the throes of a lingering recessionary economy, high unemployment, growing poverty, and not enough jobs for millions of Americans to be financially self-sufficient, consumers revolted with a coordinated national effort called “Bank Transfer Day”. November 5 was the designated day for consumers across the country to leave their banks and join local credit unions.