Daily Archive: October 5, 2011

Opinion

Uplift young men

Statistics show that, in 2008, 52 percent of male Hispanic high school graduates younger than 25 were either unemployed or incarcerated. 44 percent of Black males in the same group were either in jail or out of work. Additionally, 34 percent of Black males and 47 percent of Latino males among that group were not enrolled in college. If these trends continue, we will have a large population of young men who do not have the education or skills to find sustainable work or who will, after being released from jail, have a hard time finding a job. On an economic level, this affects us all, as it is highly possible that government and taxpayers will be called upon to subsidize their lifestyles. On a personal level, the reality is that families and entire neighborhoods will be full of men who, because we as a people didn’t do our duty, are unable to provide for their families and serve their communities.

Opinion

Much ado about nuttin’

In the wake of President Obama’s address to the Congressional Black Caucus, there are those who are making much ado about nothing, including the accusation that, by dropping his “g’s” the president was talking down to African-Americans. Can this president kindly get a break! He is accused of distancing himself from the African-American community, so he shows up at the Congressional Black Caucus Annual Legislative Conference Saturday dinner. He stays around to shake hands. The cynical would, predictably, say he is campaigning. Others appreciate the gesture for what it is, attempted outreach.

Opinion

Guest editorial…Family disputes must be private

There was a time when Black people, even if they were at each other’s throats with anger, would never let those outside of the African-American family know that there was dissent or discord within the ranks. The old folks used to say, “Don’t air your dirty laundry.” The negative reaction of a certain minority of highly-placed Blacks to President Obama’s speech to the Congressional Black Caucus and its annual gala, and the exploitation of that ongoing feud by the mainstream media highlighted the reason why African-Americans didn’t fight in public very often back during the Civil Rights Movement and earlier.

Entertainment

Black Violin effortlessly mixes classical and hip-hop

Wil B and Kev Marcus of Black Violin want to teach young kids that classical music is cool. “We come from the inner city and we understand the situations that kids are facing. We want to give back. We want kids to pick up instruments and never put them down. We want kids to understand that they can do anything they set their minds to,” said Wil B, a 29-year-old Viola player and Florida native who is one half of the classical, jazz, hip-hop musical sensation that is Black Violin. The other half of the dynamic group is violinist Kev Marcus, who is also 29 years old and hails from Florida. BLACK VIOLIN—Kev Marcus, violin, and Wil B on viola. “We really want them to think outside the box when it comes to music,” Wil said. That’s one of the lessons that Black Violin strives to teach listeners—whether they be eight-year-old students or 80-year-old grandmothers—when they attend a Black Violin performance.

Entertainment

‘Keeping up with the Mandelas’

(NNPA)—Nelson Mandela’s three grandchildren will join the reality show bandwagon, the family announced Sept. 29. The show, which will air in 2012, will show Africa’s “new middle class of intellectuals,” according to one granddaughter. “The show will be about our lives as young, Black women…We’re not wearing, ‘I’m a Mandela’ T-shirts,” said Swati Dlamini, granddaughter of Winnie Madikizela-Mandela. The show is supposed to expose the role of the new generation as career women and mothers, Mail and Guardian reports. MANDELA GRANDDAUGHTERS

Entertainment

Out & About with Brotha Ash

This week I visited Carson Street Live in Station Square, Ace and Deuces Lounge in the Hill District, Shadow Lounge in East Liberty, CJ’s in the Strip District, Galaxy Lounge in Homewood and I visited the Savoy Restaurant in the Strip District twice. My first stop was at the Savoy Restaurant in the Strip District where Style and Steel presented “Fashion Fever” as a part of Pittsburgh fashion week. This was a celebration of great fashions from different designers and enjoying a great atmosphere. Dana Ramsey of Dana’s Styling Salon in East Liberty hangin’ with Tami Roman at Carson Street Live at Divas Night Out.

Entertainment

Arts & Culture Calendar

Thursday 6 offCENTER The August Wilson Center presents off CENTER: Talent Night at AWC at 7 p.m. at 980 Liberty Ave., Cultural District. Enjoy Tony Campbell & The Funk Surgery Band, along with emcee Kevin Brown and other local artists competing on the stage. Winners will receive money and a chance to perform at the AWC’s First Voice Festival in May 2010. For more information, email Mark Southers at msouthers@augustwilsoncenter.org.

Business

Parr provides personal touch legal firm

Though attorney Darren K. Parr had achieved a high level of success as a partner in his former firm, he said he had grown to feel somewhat distant from clients. So after 12 years of expanding workers compensation, injury and asbestos litigation with Goldberg, Persky and White, he resigned and opened DKP Law in February. “I’ve always wanted to be my own boss, and I had an idea I could do something different,” he said. “I wanted to get back to representing people, families, doing more personal law. It’s a passion that I have.” ATTORNEY DARREN K. PARR That personal touch is reflected in Parr’s core clientele, working-class people who have injury complaints with their employers. Thanks to a life-long relationship with the United Steel Workers Union, Parr makes himself available to union employees by traveling to seven halls on a rotating monthly schedule.

Business

Poverty and payday loans

(NNPA)—Earlier this week new data from the U.S. Census Bureau announced that 46 million Americans now live in poverty; it is the largest number in the 52 years for which poverty estimates have been published. Since 2007, poverty has increased in 46 states and today affects one of every four American children. As it grips more and younger Americans, there is also evidence that poverty is speaking with a southern accent. The South is now home to 1.5 million of the 2.6 million people who became poor from 2009 to 2010. In the meantime, the states of Alabama, Louisiana, Mississippi, South Carolina and Tennessee all have a higher per capita concentration of payday loan shops than elsewhere in the U.S. Moreover, in these same states where unemployment hovers at 10 percent or higher, triple-digit interest payday loan rates run as high as 574 percent. Missouri is the only state outside of the South with over five payday stores per 10,000 households.

Business

President’s administration official headed to Pittsburgh

Winslow Sargeant, Ph.D, chief advocate for small business research and regulatory affairs, will make an appearance in Pittsburgh, Monday, Oct.10 at the Fairmont Hotel during the 5:30 p.m. Building Bridges for Business, third in a series of business symposiums. Appointed to his position by President Barack Obama in 2009, Sargeant, a business advocate and entrepreneurial expert, will serve as the keynote speaker during the event titled “Welcome to Oz—Where Small Business and Sustainability Collide.” READY TO SHARE—Appointed by President Barack Obama, Winslow Sargeant, chief advocate for small business research and regulatory will be in Pittsburgh Oct. 10. “Small business owners from all over the region will benefit greatly from this event and from Sargeant’s presentation,” said Ed Gainey, community development specialist for the Mayor’s Office. “It is not every day that we get someone from President Obama’s administration coming to Pittsburgh to discuss issues and share knowledge that will impact small businesses.”