Daily Archive: July 6, 2011

Metro

WAMO old, new unite for PBMF

In honor of African-American music month, an event sponsored by the Pittsburgh Black Media Federation on June 30 reunited several legendary WAMO 106.7 DJs. The evening also saw the emergence of the new WAMO 100.1’s community commitment as they partnered with PBMF to raise money for the organization’s Urban Journalism Workshop. MEDIA LEGENDS—From left: Urban Journalism workshop Co-Director Chris Moore, Brother Matt, Debbe Parker and Sly Jock share a laugh. (Photo by J.L. Martello)

Metro

Budget brings welfare worries

The last-minute budget-passing machinations that saw school vouchers and privatizing liquor stores placed on the back burner until fall, but included a bill requiring a referendum for school district tax increases above inflation, also included a separate bill giving the state Welfare department greater freedom to reduce costs that made it’s way into the $27.15 billion budget. The bill, which allows Welfare Secretary Gary Alexander to make $250 million in spending cuts without legislative input or public comment, immediately caused a stir among Welfare activists and advocates for the poor and their political allies. GARY ALEXANDER

Metro

30 of 39 homicides Black lives

The homicides of June have the City of Pittsburgh on track to more homicides than last year’s count of 100, especially within the Black community. By this time last year the homicide count was at 38, with 26 of them Black people and 23 of them Black men. Although there has only been one more homicide this year so far, there have been four more Blacks and Black men killed. Last month’s count of seven homicides seemed to be the lowest of the year and brought hope that maybe the “Stop the Violence” message was hitting home and getting through to those individuals committing the senseless acts. Well that hope is gone. Although June has been the lowest of the year, the totals show that the message has not yet gotten through and more needs to be done to get it through.

Metro

Community Calendar

Softball Game JULY 9—The Josh Gibson Foundation and Massaro Corporation will host its Annual Charity Softball Game from 10 a.m.-3 p.m. at Josh Gibson Field, 2217 Bedford Ave., Hill District. Registration of teams is still available. Proceeds for the event will benefit the Josh Gibson Academy. For more information, call 412-771-6949 or visit http://www.joshgibson.org.

National

Sharpton-West ‘showdown’ becomes dignified debate

by Jordane FrazierFor New Pittsburgh Courier (REAL TIMES NEWS SERVICE)—Chicago’s Drake Hotel grand ballroom was crowded and buzzing with anticipation June 24. Representatives from Black publications all over the country and other news organizations hoping to report on controversy, gathered at the National Newspaper Publishers Association’s annual convention for what they thought would be a spirited discussion between Princeton University professor, motivational speaker and Black philanthropist, Cornel West, Ph.D, and civil rights leader and activist, Rev. Al Sharpton about the state of Black America. DIFFERING OPINIONS—Dr. Cornel West, left, and Rev. Sharpton embrace during a discussion of the Obama administration and the plight of the Black community at the National Newspaper Publishers Association’s 2011 Annual Convention in Chicago. (Final Call Photo/Richard B. Muhammad)

National

This Week In Black History

Week of July 9-15 July 9 1863—Eight Black regiments play a major role as Union troops capture Port Hudson in Louisiana. They had laid siege to the Confederate fortress since May 23. The victory, along with the July 4 capture of Vicksburg, Miss., gave U.S. forces control of the Mississippi River, cut the Confederate army in half and laid the foundation for ending the Civil War. The Civil war would drag on for another two years but the Confederate troops fighting to maintain slavery were never able to recover from the loss of Port Hudson.

hopkendrickbox

Opinion

We must command respect

Over the years I have attended an untold number of meetings. They ran the gamut from religious, political, family, community and others. Those of you who have been in attendance at some of those meetings know I generally promoted free speech and some times I ignored Robert Rules. On occasion some—Whites and Blacks alike—would ask me about a speech I made or a column that I had written. They would ask, “Why are you so angry?” My answer is, “Of course I am angry, but it is always temporary, because the God I serve has been awfully good to me.”

Opinion

How to break NFL lockout

(NNPA)—After constant attention on negotiations in the National Football League and the subsequent lockout [where the employers refuse to let the employees work] by the owners, there has been something close to silence. Recent court rulings have permitted the owners to go forward with their lockout, at least for now. And, the rest of us just sit back and watch the calendar slowly approach the beginning of the next season.

Opinion

New IMF leader ignores world realities

(NNPA)—Part of me is delighted that France’s Finance Minister Christine Lagarde will replace the accused rapist Dominique Strauss-Kahn as managing director of the International Monetary Fund. She will be the first woman to hold this position, and her background makes her a good pick for this important position. That she is a Frenchwoman replacing another French national suggests no loss of power or influence for France after the national soul-searching on gender attitudes that the DSK imbroglio sparked. While gender is not likely to shape the ways that Lagarde approaches IMF business, interest in her gender and her background may motivate more women to consider international finance as a career path.

Opinion

Fight GOP efforts to suppress voting

A Republican proposal to make Pennsylvania voters produce government-issued photo identification at the polls will soon become law. The Republican-sponsored House Bill 934 was sent last week to the state Senate for consideration by a vote of 108–88. The bill is expected to pass the Republican-controlled state Senate and then signed into law by Republican Gov. Tom Corbett. Supporters said the bill would prevent impersonation at the polls, fictitious registrations, double voting and voting by illegal aliens.