Daily Archive: June 24, 2011

Entertainment

Springsteen famed saxophonist, Clemons passes at 69

(NNPA)—Clarence “Big Man” Clemons, famed saxophonist of singer Bruce Springsteen’s E Street Band, died June 18, a week after suffering a stroke at his home in Florida. He was 69. “His loss is immeasurable and we are honored and thankful to have known him and had the opportunity to stand beside him for nearly 40 years,” Springsteen said in a statement posted on the band’s Website. “He was my great friend, my partner, and with Clarence at my side, my band and I were able to tell a story far deeper than those simply contained in our music. His life, his memory, and his love will live on in that story and in our band.” “BIG MAN”—In this July 2, 2009 file photo, Bruce Springsteen, right, and the saxophonist Clarence Clemons, left, perform during his first Germany concert at his “working on a dream” European tour in the Olympic stadium in Munich, southern Germany. (AP Photo/Christof Stache, File)

Entertainment

Cricket launches new music service

On June 14, Cricket Wireless officially released their new Muve Music, unlimited music downloading service to Pittsburgh. The event at Stage AE introduced guests to Cricket’s new and innovative service while reiterating the strengths the wireless provider has long showcased. “We’re based around being an unlimited service, which is something we pride ourselves around. Right now we have between 50,000 and 100,000 people who are using the service,” said Kris Davis, assistant retail business manager of Cricket Smithfield. “With the product, for $55 a month you not only get talk, text, and data, but you also get unlimited music downloads.” MUVE MUSIC—From left: Kris Davis gives guests Quincy McConnell and Mike Dean a taste of Cricket’s new music downloading service. (Photo by Rebecca Nuttall) Muve Music is the first unlimited music downloading service to be provided as part of a wireless customer’s rate plan. Customers will receive the service as part of Cricket’s $55 plan that provides users with unlimited phone minutes, text messages, and Internet data usage.

Entertainment

Cover To Cover…‘My Blue Suede Shoes’

There’s no way it’s ever going to happen. Let somebody walk all over you? Uh-uh. From clerks to clients to clergy, you always get the respect you demand. You’re a strong woman, and you’re not taking any stuff from anybody. They can get steppin’ if they think they can step on you. But behind closed doors, well, that may be a whole different story. Read more in “My Blue Suede Shoes” by Tracy Price-Thompson and TaRessa Stovall, with Elizabeth Atkins and Desiree Cooper. Cornelia Christine Smart—known to thousands of fans as CC—had it all: two beautiful homes, a smokin’ car, an adorable daughter that she had adopted, and a high-powered television career. But CC was high-maintenance, and nobody could please her—least of all, her little girl.

Entertainment

Ask ­Gwendolyn…My girlfriend says she can wait for my release!

Dear Gwendolyn: I have a lot on my mind. I need your help. This is the problem: I have a woman on the street that I’ve been with for over five years before I got locked up. I’ve been down four years now. In the last year a lot of stuff has happened. She told me she now has a baby. She said that she still wants to write to me and wants to be with me when I come home, which won’t be until 2019. I don’t know what to do. I am having mixed feelings because I do love her. We have three kids together. I don’t want to be nasty toward her. I left her everything when I was locked up. I don’t know if I should get my sister to go get my cars. I also left her in control of my store. I left her in control because of my kids, but now it’s like there is someone else.

DamonCarrBox

Business

Competing goals + no plan = broken dreams

The first question I ask during a financial planning session is “what are your short-term and long-term financial goals?” Instead of responding with concrete financial goals, the answers generally relate to a particular problem that they’re currently facing that’s preventing them from getting what they want. It has been said that the average person spends more time planning what they’re going to wear to work the next day then they do planning their financial future. Most of us never took the time to identify specific financial goals and establish time frames on when we would like to accomplish our goals. Nor do we devise a plan to make our goals a reality. We simply get the idea that we desire a particular thing whether it be the latest gadget, latest fad, new home, new car, college education, etc.—and impulsively pursue it. Only when we are thwarted in our pursuit to obtain the things we want or when it’s literally the day before it’s time to deal with serious financial decisions do we begin to seek professional advice or conjure up ideas to get what we want or avoid what we don’t want.

Business

While mortgage lenders pay millions, Black Americans lose billions

(NNPA)—In recent months a series of settlements by the federal Department of Justice signal that charges of discriminatory lending not only have validity; but occur with amazing similarity in different locales. In the past week, a lawsuit against mortgage lending practices in the St. Louis metropolitan area ended with a $1.45 million settlement to resolve charges of discriminatory patterns and practices. Midwest Bank Centre agreed to open a full-service branch in a majority African-American area of the metro. Additionally other terms of the settlement call for $900,000 to increase the amount of lending to majority African-American neighborhoods; $300,000 for consumer education and credit repair programs; and $250,000 for outreach to promote their products and services to prospective customers.

Business

Four steps to paying down debt

According to the National Foundation for Credit Counseling, the top New Year’s resolution in 2011 regarding consumer finances was cutting back on debt. If you are one of those people who made that pledge, and your resolve is starting to fail, the Pennsylvania Institute of Certified Public Accountants offers these tips to help you along. Get the big picture Begin by adding up all your outstanding consumer debt. You may be in for a pleasant surprise if you come up with what seems like a reasonable number, or you may be in for a rude awakening if the total is larger than you expected. In either case, before you can create a plan to eliminate debt you must know how much you’ve got. What you find may change how much money you want to pay off each month and how long you can expect your efforts to take.

Sports

OVERTIME

:10 Dallas in six (6) as predicted!! Now all you so called B-Ball experts shut-up…Get in line and pay attention. :09 Summer youth employment opportunities cut by 83 percent…What? I wonder if that number can be reduced if, I don’t know, maybe if we weren’t spending 500 million to build a tunnel under the river to go from one side to the other! And by the way don’t we have more bridges than any other city in America…I am just asking??? BILL NEAL :08 Every athlete reading this article right now (and I mean real athletes, not Langley Grads) knows what I am about to say is true. Every college football and basketball player and maybe a few other sports, everyone that is worth something to their school, gets paid. Stop acting like Terrelle Pryor invented getting paid on the side. C’mon man!!!

Sports

NFL looking into players’ casino investment

DOTHAN, Ala. (AP)—The NFL is investigating the reported investment by at least 25 NFL players in an Alabama casino that has been shut down, a business venture that might have run afoul of league rules. NFL spokesman Greg Aiello confirmed the investigation Friday, a day after Yahoo! Sports reported that wide receivers Terrell Owens, Santonio Holmes, Santana Moss and other players had invested some $20 million in Country Crossing casino. The report also named defensive tackle Gerard Warren and linebacker Adalius Thomas, a free agent who played for the New England Patriots until his release before last season. SANTONIO HOLMES NFL rules bar employees from involvement with any gaming operation. Players violating that rule could be subject to fines or suspensions and have to give up their investment. Country Crossing owner Ronnie Gilley and two of his lobbyists have pleaded guilty to offering legislators millions in bribes.

Sports

McIlroy win could be one for ages

BETHESDA, Md. (AP)—The lead was 10 following yet another birdie as Rory McIlroy walked off the fourth green and handed his Titleist to a tousle-haired teen watching from just beyond the ropes at Congressional. A nice souvenir for the kid, who may one day dream of having a future in golf. And appropriate that it was given to him by the kid who may be the future of golf. GOLF’S NEWEST PHENOM—Rory McIlroy, of Northern Ireland, holds up the trophy after winning the U.S. Open Championship golf tournament in Bethesda, Md., June 19. His romp in the park at the U.S. Open didn’t just make McIlroy a major champion for the first time at a younger age than the great Jack Nicklaus. It also announced the arrival of a player so talented and magnetic that golf may stop caring so much about Tiger Woods. The 37,000 people who lined the fairways and surrounded the greens on a steamy Sunday seemed to sense that. They cheered every shot, even though the little drama that remained evaporated when McIlroy birdied the first hole to let everyone know this was not the Masters and there would be no meltdown.