Daily Archive: March 18, 2011

Metro

Corbett’s budget cuts public schools deeply

Last week Gov. Tom Corbett proposed a budget that would slash the state’s education spending by $1.5 billion, forcing local school districts to cut their own spending by 10 percent across the board. At the K-12 level the budget calls for a $550 million cut and the elimination of $260 million in grants. LINDA LANE In what might have been a preemptive measure, Pittsburgh Public School District Superintendant Linda Lane recently restructured her administration, eliminating five vacant positions to save taxpayers $141,000 per year. Lane has also challenged all central office departments to reduce their budget by ten percent to save approximately $3.5 million per year. “Since becoming superintendent in January, I continue to seek ways to make the District more efficient and effective in providing service to our students,” Lane said.

Metro

Tuskegee Airman dies at 97

As a member of one of the most prestigious military units, the Tuskegee Airmen, Henry Dawson McCullough, of Point Breeze, was laid to rest last week after peacefully passing on March 5 at the age of 97. McCullough was born on Oct. 13, 1913 in South Carolina and later relocated to Pittsburgh at a young age. He was educated in the Pittsburgh Public School system and then attended the University of Pittsburgh, where he earned a degree from their College of Business Administration in 1936. TUSKEGEE AIRMEN

Metro

Corbett cuts community development funds

The Second largest cut in Gov. Tom Corbett’s budget is to the Department of Community and Economic Development, which would be slashed by $114 millio. The department has been criticized as a vehicle for politicians to garner votes by funding pet projects with “walking around money,” that is doing little to develop local economies. In his address, Corbett said a business owner would need a “Sherpa” to find his way through the DCED ­bureaucracy. No more. GOV. TOM CORBETT “Where once there were 127 programs there are now 56. I think that’s a manageable number and a better way of keeping track,” he said. “Additionally, we have straight-out eliminated line items that produced little more than spending. We have set a goal. We’re looking for results. We’re looking for new jobs, not votes.”

National

3 men who discovered bomb say they later lost jobs

SPOKANE, Wash. (AP)—Three cleanup workers who were hailed as heroes after finding a live bomb along the route of a Martin Luther King Jr. Day parade in Spokane said they later lost their jobs after supervisors questioned their handling of the situation. The men were employed by Labor Ready and working under contract for the Spokane Public Facilities District when they found a backpack containing the bomb about an hour before the scheduled start of the Jan. 17 parade. They alerted police, who were able to defuse the bomb. BOMBING SUSPECT ARRESTED—Kevin William Harpham, who has ties to a White supremacist organization, was arrested March 9, on charges that he left a bomb along a Martin Luther King Jr. Day parade route in Spokane, Wash. (AP Photo/KXLY 4 News)

National

Black newspapers criticize NAACP for being excluded in Image Awards marketing

by Ayana JonesThe Philadelphia Tribune (NNPA)—The NAACP has been criticized for not including Black newspapers in a recent advertising campaign. The NAACP inserted its 42nd NAACP Image Awards Magazine in the Philadelphia Daily News, however the advertisement was not included in The Philadelphia Tribune and other markets (Los Angeles, Atlanta, Texas, New York, New Jersey and Chicago). OUTSTANDING PICTURE—Tyler Perry accepts the award for outstanding motion picture for the movie “For Colored Girls,” from Angela Bassett at the 42nd NAACP Image Awards on March 4, in Los Angeles. (AP Photo/Chris Pizzello)

National

King: Next hearing is on radical Muslims in prison

by Laurie KellmanAssociated Press Writer WASHINGTON (AP)—The chairman of the House Homeland Security Committee is pressing forward with his public examination of Muslim extremism in America, pointing to his first, tense hearing on the subject as a step toward desensitizing a taboo topic and rooting out terrorists on U.S. soil. “There’s an elephant in the room and nobody wants to talk about it. We talked about it today,” Peter King said after the four-hour, emotion-filled session March 10. CONTROVERSIAL HEARING—Zuleyha Ozonder, Hashi Shafi and Zuhmer Ahmed watch a hearing on the “radicalization” of U.S. Muslims, chaired by Rep. Peter King of the House Homeland Security Committee in Washington, from Minneapolis, March 10.

Opinion

Urgent call to action: Save and support Black colleges

(NNPA)—The survival of Historically Black Colleges and Universities is at stake. Today, more than ever before, there is an urgent necessity to stand up, speak out, and let the voice and fundamental interests of 45 million Black Americans be heard. Education has always been at the heart of our long struggle for freedom, justice, and equality. Proposed budget cuts by the U.S. Congress will put Historically Black Colleges and Universities and Predominantly Black Institutions in a severe fiscal crisis.

georgecurrybox

Opinion

Mother of the year every year

(NNPA)—Tabernacle Baptist Church in Augusta, Ga., honored my mother, Mrs. Martha L. Brownlee, last Sunday as “Mother of the Year” as part of its annual Women’s Day celebration. Church members have learned what my three sisters—Charlotte Purvis, Chris Polk and Susan Gandy—and I have known all of our lives: Mama is Mother of the Year every year. This is Women’s History Month and many young females are studying historical figures in search of role models. As a former history major, I can appreciate the need to know our history. It is equally important to realize that sometimes the role models we are searching for are within our own households. That’s true of my mother and is true of many other mothers. Although Mama did domestic work most of her life, when I think of her occupation, I think of her as a teacher. In that respect, all four of her children were home schooled. We went to school, only to return home for additional schooling. At home, Mama taught us by example.

Opinion

Gender equality is everybody’s business

(NNPA)—March is Women’s History Month, and the White House Council on Women and Girls, led by Valerie Jarrett, commemorated it by releasing a report on the status of women. According to the report, we’ve come a long way sisters, but we’ve still got a long way to go. Despite the fact that we out-enroll men in college, we under-earn them in the workplace. There are so many phenomenal women accomplishing amazing things, and at the same time there are so many women whose economic attainment is constrained by gender. We in the African-American community must be concerned with the social construction of gender and the ways that patriarchy shapes the futures of our young people, both young women and young men. The face of African-American leadership, mostly all male, sends a signal to young women. It suggests that women’s voices don’t matter, that we have to scrap our way to the table. It denigrates the enormity of African-American women’s accomplishments.

Opinion

For state of Black America: The issue is jobs

(NNPA)—From March 29 through 31, the National Urban League brings its fight for urban jobs to Capitol Hill with its 2011 Legislative Policy Conference. This year’s summit will make the case for targeted action to tackle the persistent unemployment crisis in Black America. Dozens of Urban League affiliate delegations comprised of CEOs, board chairs and the presidents of affiliate Guild and Young Professional auxiliaries will join us for meetings on Capitol Hill with U. S. Senators and Representatives.