Daily Archive: February 10, 2011

Sports

Steelers- Ravens III

The most intense rivalry in football is the Pittsburgh Steelers and Baltimore Ravens. This weekend will be no exception. It will be for the right to do battle with the winner of the New England Patriots and New York Jets for the AFC championship on Jan 23. The two teams won on the other’s home field during the regular season; finished with identical records (12-4) third best record in the NFL; have the best two defenses; and have very inconsistent offenses. With the exception of the Patriots, they are probably the best two teams in football. So what will be the difference Saturday?

Sports

The Big Queasy

Gumbo, cajun, catfish, katrina, jazz, saints. The aforementioned are all things about the storied city of New Orleans that we love and dislike. One thing for certain and two things for sure, the Saints, as a result of being unceremoniously dumped by the Seattle Seahawks from this year’s postseason, will not be marching west to Dallas to defend their crown in Super Bowl XLV. Sometimes things like that happen when we begin to believe our own hype and get an early start on our own personal Mardi Gras.

Metro

Lane: Community input a priority

As some children are prone to do, the daughter of newly appointed Pittsburgh Public School District superintendent Linda Lane frequently broke her curfew. After several warnings from her mother, Lane’s daughter returned home late one night to find her parents had packed up her belongings in preparation of moving her into the local YMCA. BACKGROUND—Linda Lane shares a few personal anecdotes with Lynne Hayes-Freeland. (Photo by J.L. Martello) Lane’s response to her daughter’s disobedience gave credence to the traditional parental adage, “If you live in my house, you have to follow my rules.” At a meeting with the community at CAPA High School on Jan. 10, Lane showed she would carry this same approach with her in her new role as superintendent.

Metro

Burgess referendums move to protect taxpayers

Continuing his flurry of legislative activity since helping to vote down Mayor Luke Ravenstahl’s plan to lease city-owned parking spaces, District 9 Councilman Rev. Ricky Burgess has introduced a bill to restrict elected officials from running for higher public office. Burgess’ “Resign to Run” bill would place a referendum on the May ballot to amend the city charter and require that public officials resign their posts if they run for higher office. He announced the legislation prior to the start of the Jan. 11 council session.

Metro

Burgess blasts East Liberty tax zone plan

Even as he was working on legislation to give Pittsburgh residents more say in how taxes are levied via referendum, City Councilman Rev. Rickey Burgess had to, again, battle a plan to tax property owners in his district. The plan for an East Liberty Neighborhood Improvement District first arose in 2007, before Burgess even took office, and focuses on the Penn Avenue corridor. It was shot down by residents and business owners who objected to an additional tax. EMPOWERING VOTERS—One week after introducing a bill to give voters power to reject tax hikes, Pittsburgh Councilman Rev. Rickey Burgess announces his bill to require city officials to resign before running for higher office. The ELNID would collect fees to pay for services like sidewalk cleaning, graffiti removal and security and would be funded via fees levied not only on business property owners, but also residential owners who rent out property, nonprofits—including churches—and properties that are otherwise tax exempt. Its projected budget is $475,000 per year.

Metro

Year round proposed for Westinghouse high

Across the country, educators and school administrators are working to find innovative solutions to problems in urban school districts. Charter schools and other private institutions have taken the lead in restructuring their schools with longer school days and school years, an idea that is slowly gaining prominence with public schools also. On Jan. 26, the school board will vote on a recommendation by the East End Region Advisory Committee to establish a trimester calendar schedule at the two 6-12 single-gender academies soon to be created at Westinghouse High School. “Moving to a trimester provides students fewer classes per term, allowing students to focus on core academic subjects,” said Assistant Superintendent Derrick Lopez. “The new calendar also is more representative of what our students can expect at a college or university.”

Metro

Courier celebrates 100 years of influence

For the past 100 years, the Courier, once the country’s largest Black newspaper, has been setting the tone on major issues impacting the African-American community. On Feb. 19 its history and accomplishments will be celebrated at “The New Pittsburgh Courier: 100 Years of Influence Centennial Gala” at Stage AE from 6-11 p.m. CARRIE LUCAS The event will not only celebrate the rich history of the New Pittsburgh Courier, but also pay homage to the Pittsburgh Courier, its predecessor. The evening will include a VIP cocktail reception, a dinner, a legacy awards program, a dessert reception and a concert by Carrie Lucas, the head diva of LA’s Solar Records.

Metro

McKeesport votes Diggs first Black council VP

Last week’s controversy between McKeesport Mayor Regis McLaughlin and McKeesport City Council overshadowed an important milestone for the city’s government. On Jan. 4 Councilwoman Loretta Diggs was elected as the first African-American vice president of McKeesport City Council. “I got unanimous votes and I couldn’t believe it. It feels good. Whenever I ran for council I was the first Black ever endorsed in this town,” Diggs said. “I’m not a ‘yes’ person. I had a lot of problems because I was so aggressive. I worked very hard for this and evidently it paid off.” MILESTONE—After 40 years in politics, Loretta Diggs became the first African-American woman to serve as vice president of McKeesport city council. (Photo by J.L. Martello) Council elected Diggs, 77, to the position of vice president by a 7-0 vote. As she begins her third term on council, Diggs said her newly appointed position would give her greater power to affect change for her district and the city of McKeesport.

hopkendrickbox

Opinion

Will we awaken in 2011?

As we go about our regular routines, are we in a state of improvement, decline or no change at all? Those of us who pay attention and are really concerned recognize the decline in our over all status. I understand very clearly that there are those who perceive themselves as doing all right and they too frequently perform in that long time detrimental role of the spook that sits by the door, gate keepers and I believe the most deadly to themselves is assimilation. Why do I state assimilation is the most deadly, because those people that you aspire to be like are the ones that have practiced every form of degradation in the history of this nation. They truly believe that pigment of our skin makes us inferior to them in every aspect of this nation. Yesteryear and even in 2011 at every opportunity Blacks are denied an equal opportunity, education, employment, promotions business opportunities, etc.

georgecurrybox

Opinion

‘Job killer’ lies about health care reform

(NNPA)—Republican leaders in the House are trying to repeal health care reform by asserting that it is a “job killer” and will cause the deficit to rise. According to an array of independent assessments, the GOP is wrong on both counts. Rep. Eric Canton, R-Va., introduced a bill aimed at killing key provisions of the Health Care and Education Reconstruction Act of 2010. Cantor’s 2-page bill says, “This act may be cited as the ‘Repealing the Job-Killing Care Law Act.’” But giving the bill a catchy name doesn’t mean the description is accurate. “House Republicans claim that the legislation (the Affordable Care Act) is a ‘job-killer’ imply that health care reform measures will be a major drag on the economy because they will allegedly increase employers’ costs,” the Center on Budget and Policy Priorities noted. “But these claims are not supported by the evidence, and they are at odds with leading non-partisan assessments of how health care reform legislation will affect the economy and labor markets.”