Daily Archive: January 17, 2011

Metro

King Brown to leave KDKA-TV

PATRICE KING BROWN On Jan. 28, local news anchor Patrice King Brown will leave KDKA-TV after more than three decades with the station. With her, Brown will take the station’s daily African-American presence, leaving a void many worry will not be filled. “I’d like to be closer to my family. There are a lot of things that I can’t do with three news casts a day,” Brown said. “I’m hoping to not go away completely and still do some projects here. I’m not looking at it as retirement.” Brown plans to move to California where a majority of her family lives.

Metro

Rev. Jackson deems progressives 3rd party

On the eve of the AFC Championship football game between the Pittsburgh Steelers and the New York Jets, Rev. Jesse Jackson opened his keynote address at the Pennsylvania Progressive Summit 2011 with a football metaphor. RACIAL, SOCIAL, ECONOMIC JUSTICE—Rev. Jesse Jackson leads the audience in a chant. (Photo by J.L. Martello) “If some had to go 12 yards to get a first down, and others had to go eight yards, we wouldn’t like that game. The referees know the rules,” Jackson said “This is not applied to congressional oversight of the banks. Banks have lapsed under the weight of lack of oversight and are paid to fail.” Jackson’s speech was part of the culminating event in the first day of the Summit, a weekend of workshops and presentations organized by Keystone Progress, Service Employees International Union, the Alliance for American Manufacturing and Democracy for America.

Metro

Summit Against Racism: Police accountability still key

In the 14 years since Pittsburgh businessman Jonny Gammage was killed by police officers during a routine traffic stop, members of the Black and White Reunion have been a leading voice in the call for better police accountability. This theme carried on into this year’s 13th Annual Summit Against Racism as community organizer and participants carried on their struggle. FOUNDER—Tim Stevens welcomes participants with an introduction to the summit’s schedule. (Photo by J.L. Martello) “What we attempt to do every year is to have people leave with a renewed commitment and to do something, anything, no matter what it is,” said Tim Stevens, founder of the Black and White Reunion. “If we can accomplish that every year, we consider this a success.” The mission of the Black and White Reunion is to bring together organizations and individuals to eliminate racism and promote human equality. At last year’s summit this mission found relevance in the case of Jordan Miles, the former CAPA High School student beaten by three police officers.

Metro

PIRC, police see progress on violence

With the increase in homicides in 2010, it is not surprising that some question whether Pittsburgh police Chief Nate Harper’s call for community members, churches, businesses and nonprofits fell on deaf ears. Harper does not think it has, but witnesses to shootings are generally still reluctant to speak, so he continues to ask for any assistance he can get. CHIEF NATE HARPER “Various churches are stepping up and actively working with the neighborhood youth in a vigilant effort to curtail much of the existing crime and deter the criminal element,” he said. “We continue to work and improve the relationship with the communities we serve. We welcome and encourage cooperation with the communities as we strive to work together to solve these violent and senseless crimes.”

Metro

Rev. Barr recovering

REV. JASON BARR More than a month after being cut out of his vehicle after a horrific car accident near Robert Morris University in Moon Township, Macedonia Baptist Church in the Hill District Pastor, Rev. Jason Barr Jr., has been released from the hospital and is at home recuperating.

Metro

Black on Black violence tops CMU King panel discussion

“I have a dream that my four little children will one day live in a nation where they will not be judged by the color of their skin but by the content of their character,” said Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. on the steps of the Lincoln Memorial in Washington, D.C., August 28, 1963. Things haven’t changed as much as Dr. King had hoped. Members of the Carnegie Mellon University community, along with local denizens, gathered in CMU’s McConomy Auditorium on Jan. 17 to honor the legacy of Rev. Dr. King.

Metro

Glover gives final lesson

A love for education and a dedication to impacting the lives of youth is what kept Preola Glover teaching in the Pittsburgh Public School System for 31 years. On Jan. 21, Glover ended her lesson in life at Forbes Hospice after a battle with Multiple Myeloma, a form of cancer. Glover was born on Sept. 23, 1940 in Montgomery, Ala., and taught English at a school in Georgia, where she met and married the late Arthur Lee Glover. In 1968 she received a job offer with the Boy Scouts of America and moved to Pittsburgh. PREOLA GLOVER

hopkendrickbox

Opinion

Super Bowl or Super Distraction?

Yes it’s that time of year again and the Steelers banners are flying; flags on the cars and pickup trucks; black and gold leather jackets; all sizes of expensive official league jerseys; taverns, cafes, restaurants, hotels, homes all having parties. There have been huge rallies where celebrities and all politicians participate. It becomes almost the equal of being in New Orleans. Yes happy days are here again everywhere you go and people are in a festive mood. In neighborhoods where crime and unemployment statistics are dismal there is Steelers mania.

georgecurrybox

Opinion

News reports do not mirror reality in Côte d’Ivoire

(NNPA)—According to news accounts, Côte d’Ivoire is a tense, unsafe paralyzed West African country because of a contested presidential election in which incumbent President Laurent Gbagbo refuses to cede his office to Alassane Ouattara, whom the international community—especially France and the U.S.—has proclaimed the winner of the recent presidential election. There are almost daily reports that the 15-member Economic Community of West African States is drawing up military plans to invade the country and drive Gbagbo from his regal presidential palace.

Opinion

Is there really a deficit crisis?

(NNPA)—In the wake of the State of the Union Address there is likely to be much partisan conversation about the direction of our nation. President Obama will address the economy and jobs, and Republicans will talk about the health of the economy, and about cutting budgets in their rebuttal. Citing growing deficits, both parties are concerned that spending is out of control. Yet some spending is absolutely needed to create jobs, just as $700 billion of spending was needed to bail out banks. It intrigues me that the same folk who eagerly bailed banks out have now suddenly discovered the concept of budget cuts and are pushing them, even as they have added to the deficit by insisting on extending Bush tax cuts.