Daily Archive: October 29, 2010

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Metro

Bush: Education KEY to breaking chain of poverty

At the 2010 State of Black Pittsburgh at the August Wilson Center for African American Culture Oct. 22, Esther Bush, Urban Lea­gue of Greater Pittsburgh president and CEO, gave her yearly report on the dire statistics facing the African-American community and all the Urban League has done to try and change them. ESTHER BUSH “The Urban League of Greater Pittsburgh is pivotal to the socio-economic survival of African-American families and communities now more than ever in our history. Neighborhood crime, poverty, economic hardships and unsafe schools should be the exception, not the rule. Yet, 26 percent of American children, age six and younger, live below the poverty line and poor children are more likely to be victims of crime and school dropouts,” Bush said. “In a nation deemed the most powerful in the world, this is unacceptable. In a city dub­bed the most livable in the nation, the increase in poverty, fueling other social ills, is unacceptable.”

Metro

Educator challenges city to demand more from their schools

It takes a certain level of courage to criticize a group of people who have hired you to serve as the keynote speaker at their annual celebration. Still, at the Pittsburgh Chapter, National Black MBA Association’s 2010 Scholarship and Recognition Gala, guest speaker Steve Perry, Ed.D did just that. HARSH CRITIC—Steve Perry delights and stuns the audience with quick jokes and biting facts about Pittsburgh education. (Photo by Rossano P. Stewart) See photos on C3. “It’s an absolute abomination that children in this city are so far behind. In this city that has such pride and purpose, what the devil is going on with your schools?” said Perry, the founder of Capital Preparatory Magnet School in Hartford, Conn. “You can’t continue to give scholarships to children when they are being sent to college unprepared.”

Metro

What do you think of school Superintendent Mark Roosevelt resigning?

Superintendent Mark Roosevelt recently resigned after five years. We asked Pittsburghers what they thought. Here’s what you said: “Resigning may be one of the most thoughtful actions Roosevelt could have done on behalf of our children. Our Black youth are already at risk in these public schools and when unqualified professionals take the lead they’re in a danger zone. Roosevelt was a danger zone.”LaKeisha WolfHill DistrictEntrepreneur LaKEISHA WOLF, NIKI NEW, THOMAS RENSOM

National

Black firefighters launch campaign to reduce fire deaths

by Brian Stimson For New Pittsburgh Courier (NNPA)—The International Association of Black Professional Fire Fighters launched the “No Child Left Alone Fire Safety Campaign” during Fire Prevention Week, in order to educate Black people everywhere about the risk of fire in their communities. Of all children killed in home fires, 38 percent were Black according to a 2008 report by the U.S. Fire Administration. According to the Black Firefighters Association: •Black Americans face a risk of fire death almost twice that of individuals of another race;

National

Charlotte soft drink bottler settles racial bias claim

(NNPA)—Coca-Cola Bottling Company Consolidated of Charlotte has agreed to pay $495,000 in back wages and interest to 95 African-American and Hispanic job seekers for racial discrimination. The applicants applied in 2002 for sales support positions at the company’s Black Satchel Road distribution facility in Charlotte. The settlement follows an investigation by the U.S. Department of Labor’s Office of Federal Contract Compliance Programs.

National

Time magazine recognizes Jealous, NAACP president and CEO

(NNPA)—NAACP president and CEO Ben Jealous received two honors recently as he was named among Time magazine’s “40 Under 40 Rising Stars of U.S. Politics” and one of the “Top 50 people of Power and Influence” by The NonProfit Times. “The NAACP congratulates President Benjamin Todd Jealous on making the Time magazine ‘40 Under 40’ and The NonProfit Times’ ‘Power and Influence Top 50’ lists,” NAACP Board of Directors Chairman Roslyn Brock said in a statement. “In a little over two years, President Jealous has led the association in tackling some of the hardest issues facing the American public, including health care reform, the financial crisis and predatory lending. His hard work and commitment to justice allows the association to continue in the struggle for better jobs, education and equality for all Americans.” BEN JEALOUS

Opinion

Fed up with the Transportation Safety Administration

I arrived at the Los Angeles Airport more than an hour early. I had made good time on the highway. I wasn’t checking any bags, so with my boarding pass in hand I proceeded to the gate. I was greeted with a security line that was almost an hour long. The line snaked around the terminal, out the door, and stretched down the sidewalk. At the front of the line sat a lone Transportation Safety Administration officer studiously checking identification with a jeweler’s loupe, the small magnifying glass jewelers use to look for flaws in gemstones.

Opinion

End gay discrimination

The United States is suffering from an identity crisis when it comes to the rights and safety of homosexuals and lesbians. On the one hand, the government says it respects the rights of gays to live as domestic partners, to be free from violence and to work in whatever field they choose, even the military. Yet, the government seems to do very little—and even contradicts itself—when it comes to making these ideas reality.

Opinion

Preaching the politics of privilege

“…the detection of national White majority interests can be achieved by understanding the sources of White racial alienation that led to the development of an intellectual rationale of polices of ‘failure.’…this rationale was used as a pretext for attacks upon policies oriented toward Black group interests and on the federal government which supported them…the federal government must be weakened… Whites who control that system have always utilized their power to create a subclass of Blacks who are especially attentive to their political needs.”—Dr. Ronald Walters Politics is widely defined as who gets what, when and how much. The midterm elections for United States Senate, U.S. House of Representatives, and governorships scheduled for Nov. 2—whichever American political party prevails—will determine who gets what, when and how much.

Opinion

Gun violence: The erosion of our communities

The NAACP Pittsburgh Unit is sounding the alarm. The increasing number of victims of gun violence and their families has to stop. We must join the hundreds of others who publicly go on record to declare that we must stop tolerating the senseless shooting in our neighborhoods, our communities and in our city. No, this is not a new alarm. It is a revisit to the need to sound the alarm to help wake up the community to the fact that we are feeding into the minds and desires of the enemy. To paraphrase the old adage: “Guns don’t kill people, people kill people. Bullets do not have eyes.”