Daily Archive: September 24, 2010

Metro

Community groups work to end violence

In a recent exclusive editorial board meeting with Pittsburgh Police Chief Nate Harper, he discussed the need for more community responsibility to end the epidemic of Black-on-Black violence in Pittsburgh and Allegheny County. There are several community groups, those individuals who work with little or no funding to better their community. The New Pittsburgh Courier asked several of the groups their reaction to Harper and what their roles and solutions were end the violence in the community. GIVING THEIR TIME—Back, from left: James Arms, James Herring, Fred “Scrappy” Bulls and John Arms. Front, from left: Flo Wilson and Mildred Tyler. All are members of the Northside Old Timers, one of the most well known community groups in Pittsburgh. One of the most recognized groups is the Northside Old Timers, which works with youths from kindergarten to eight years of age. English Burton, Outreach chairperson and one of the original founders of the group, said they focus on young people because those are the ages that set the foundation to prevent kids from getting involved in violent situations.

Metro

URA allocates funds for new Homewood housing

Nothing breeds success like success, and the Urban Redevelopment Authority of Pittsburgh is pleased to help Building United of Southwestern Pennsylvania and its Executive Director Rev. Samuel Ware continue the success it is having rebuilding Homewood. BUILDING THE FUTURE—Executive Director Rev. Samuel Ware thanks the URA board for its continuing support of the Building United’s housing project in Homewood. During its Sept. 17 meeting, the authority authorized more than $600,000 in funding for the second phase of Building United’s project to turn former Section 8 housing near the Faison Elementary School into for-sale homes.

Metro

Hill reps say they must be involved in any Arena replacement

To no one’s surprise, the board of the Sports and Exhibition Authority of Pittsburgh and Allegheny County have opted to tear down the Civic Arena. Carl Redwood, co-chair of the Hill Consensus Group, said though residents generally want the arena demolished, he doesn’t see any immediate benefit for the Hill. CARL REDWOOD But there is no immediate benefit if it remains either. “If it remains a parking lot for years, as the preservationists say, it will benefit the Penguins, not the Hill,” he said. “But we have a clear set of development principles for the 28-acre site. We want some level of mixed-income housing, and we want Hill residents and businesses included in all new development. Basically, we don’t want to be displaced or ignored.”

National

Ohio man faces hate crimes charge in church arson

CLEVELAND (AP)—An Ohio man has been indicted on a federal hate crimes charge in what authorities say was a racially motivated arson at a church with a mostly Black congregation. The two-count indictment against Ronald Pudder, 23, of Conneaut in northeast Ohio, was detailed at a news conference Sept. 22 with the nation’s top civil rights attorney, Thomas E. Perez, assistant attorney general for the Justice Department’s Civil Rights Division. He said the government was determined to deter a rash of copycat crimes. “Hate crimes reflect a cancer of the soul,” Perez said.

National

Hundreds rally for release of Miss. women

JACKSON, Miss. (AP)— Nearly 400 protesters marched to the governor’s mansion and the Mississippi Capitol to call for the release of two sisters who are serving life sentences for a robbery that netted $11. PROTEST LIFE SENTENCES—Civil rights activist Dorothy Benford of Jackson, waves a sign with $11 in singles hanging from it to protest the life sentences Jamie and Gladys Scott received for a robbery that netted that same amount, during a rally at the Capitol in Jackson, Miss., Sept. 15. Representatives of the Mississippi ACLU and several other groups joined civil rights veterans in the effort to get a pardon for Jamie and Gladys Scott, who have served nearly 16 years in prison for the 1993 crime in Scott County.

MilesDavis

National

This Week In Black History

Week of Sept. 24-30 September 24 MILES DAVIS 1957—President Dwight Eisenhower orders federal troops into Little Rock, Ark., to prevent angry Whites from interfering with the integration of the city’s Central High School by nine Black students. The confrontation was one of the most dramatic during the early days of the Civil Rights Movement. Governor Orval Faubus had vowed to go to jail to block the court ordered desegregation of the school claiming that Whites would be destroyed if they integrated with Blacks. But the confrontation settled the issue of whether states had to obey orders issued by federal courts.

Opinion

Open letter on poverty to America’s local, state and national leaders

WASHINGTON (NNPA)—The U.S. Census Bureau’s recent report on poverty in the United States is a clarion call to our nation and our elected leaders. We in the United States possess the greatest resources and wealth ever known to humankind. So, to have more than 44 million people—14 percent of our population—and 20 percent of our children living in poverty strains the soul of America. That fully one in four Americans—72 million people—are “near poor” (officially, a family of four earning just $32,634 in 2009) should call us into action. It’s a moral disgrace.

Opinion

Closing the income gap

First, the good news. Women are earning more money today than they were 10 years ago. Slowly but surely, gender pay disparities are becoming a thing of the past. Historically, women have always earned less than men. When women first went to work outside of the home, they typically took on “pink collar” jobs that, for many reasons, paid a lower salary. However, as women began to become more educated and branch into different fields, even those dominated by men, they found that their salaries remained lower than that of their male counterparts…even if they were doing the same jobs.

Opinion

The absurdity of the racialist playbook

The absurdity of race continues to rear its ugly head and once again, the succubus appears in Mississippi. The folks in the magnolia state can’t seem to get it right on race even when they use the liberal racialist playbook. A few weeks ago the Nettleton Middle School in Nettleton, Miss., came under fire when it was discovered that the school was dividing offices on its student council by race. The offices open only to Black or White students rotated each year. In addition, the school maintained separate racial titles for its prom and homecoming kings and queens.

Opinion

Haiti: Accounting for the money

(NNPA)—President Obama showed positive leadership after the catastrophe in Haiti by pledging the resources of the U.S. government to our neighbor in need. Yet, eight months after the quake, many of the country’s internally displaced persons remain without food, water, sanitation and shelter. Additionally, civil society and local non-governmental organizations in Haiti report that many international NGOs responsible for policy and programs have been less proactive and seldom prioritize working directly with Haitians.