Daily Archive: September 8, 2010

Metro

Black arts entities may see RAD cuts

The August Wilson Center for African American Culture is asking for $102,500 more in Allegheny County RAD funding than the $247,500 it received last year. And it is not alone among African-American arts organizations trying to stay afloat in difficult economic times. Of the eight Black arts entities applying for annual grant funding, all requested increases, some as much as six times the amount they received for 2010. ANDRE KIMO STONE GUESS is president and CEO, of the August Wilson African American Cultural Center. The AWC, which is working to pay down $8.5 million in construction overruns, requested the funding to help pay operating costs. President and CEO Andre Kimo Stone Guess said the center hasn’t generated sufficient funds from its 480-seat theater. He said the focus will now be renting out its facilities, putting on jazz and dance festivals, and presentations of August Wilson’s plays, which may be filmed for distribution.

Metro

Stanton Heights group gets demolished in battle

The Stanton Heights Community Organization took another hit recently in their battle to stop construction of a new school in their neighborhood. Although SHCO has filed an appeal to stop construction, Neighborhood Acad­emy, a private institution, has begun clearing the land they purchased for their proposed facilities. GREEN SPACE—From left: Residents Jean Bryant, Byron Monroe and Howard Harrington look on at the former woodland. “They have cleared the land of all the trees. It looks pretty barren,” said Jean Bryant, president of SHCO. “The neighborhood is very upset about what they’re seeing right now which is a barren wasteland.” The battle over the land began in January 2009 when Neighborhood Academy first presented its plans to the community. Though members of SHCO and some others did not approve of the proposal, it was approved by the city zoning board and Neighborhood Academy moved forward with plans to begin construction.

Metro

Wilkinsburg youth raise their voices

It took a while for the group of Wilkinsburg teens at the Weed and Seed Youth Speak Out forum to calm down and focus on the task in front of them, but once they did, representatives from the city and county heard their voices. “We need more people to identify with the youth and how they can help us,” said Kymi Ewing. “The equipment in the recreation centers is not up to par so they want more equipment both indoor and outdoor. We want the Wilkinsburg school district to help so you won’t be bored after school.” EXPECTATIONS—From left: Timiya Jackson and Kymi Ewing hold a chart of expectations from community youths. The young people at the forum in St. Stephens Church called for more activities and recreation while at the same time asking to see improvements in their education. Many were also concerned with public safety and especially the all too frequent teen pregnancies in their community.

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Metro

44 of 63 homicides Black lives…Time for a plan and support

The month of August had 12 homicides, that is 12 lives too many. There have been friends killing friends, people shot and killed while leaving family gatherings or even in their own home. All for what? Nothing. Marches and vigils will not stop it. It is time for a plan of action and for everyone to be on one accord. Much can be accomplished if everyone works together. The only way to end this insanity is by demanding a stronger police presence. There must be more car and foot patrols. But they alone cannot do it. They need the support of the community. Realistically, the police cannot be everywhere. It is up to us to report what we see. How can we expect them to lock up the criminals, if they don’t know who or where they are? Yes, there is this “no snitching” code, but it’s only snitching if you are involved in the crime.

National

Founder of Florida A&M Marching 100 dies at 91

TALLAHASSEE, Fla. (AP)—William P. Foster, credited with innovating a much-imitated high-stepping style as founder and longtime director of the Florida A&M Marching 100 band, died Aug. 28 in Tallahassee university officials said. He was 91. Foster served as the marching band’s director from 1946 until his retirement in 1998. He created more than 200 halftime pageants for the band at the historically Black university. LEGENDARY BANDLEADER—In this July 16, 2008 photo, Benjamin McNamee, 17, from Miami, Fla., right, shakes hands with William Foster, 88, left, founder of the Florida A&M Marching 100 band, during a break at the FAMU band camp in Tallahassee, Fla.

Metro

Speak Out: What is your response to the withdrawal of our troops from Iraq?

President Obama recently announced the withdrawal of combat troops from Irag, leaving 50,000 there for support. We asked Pittsburghers what they thought. Here’s what you said: “We need to have them away from there. We have enough wars right here and it seems we’re not getting the help we need. I’m glad to see us coming home. We have enough bloodshed overseas and at home.”Louise LowrySquirrel HillRetired

Metro

Metro Beat

Filing for bankruptcy AP—The owner of a troubled Downtown Pittsburgh hotel has filed for bankruptcy. The former Pittsburgh Hilton Hotel filed for Chapter 11 bankruptcy protection Monday in Pittsburgh. The hotel owned by Shubh Hotels Pittsburgh LLC of Boca Raton, Fla., claims in the court filing that it has between $10 million and $50 million in assets and between $50 million and $100 million in debts.

Metro

Community Calendar

Recovery celebration SEPT. 8—Familylinks will host their Life-Changing Seminar Series as a part of the 21st Annual National Alcohol and Drug Addiction Recovery Month from 6-8 p.m. at 250 Shady Ave., Shadyside. The theme is “Join the Voices for Recovery: Now More Than Ever!” Each Wednesday in September session will be help to help build stronger, healthier communities. This week’s session will focus on “Drama Free Relationships.” Registration is required and refreshments will be served. For more information, call Bessie Sewell Hudson at 412-924-0243 or bhudson@familylinks.org.

National

Has Iraq war really ended for Obama, U.S.?

by Steven R. Hurst WASHINGTON (AP)—President Barack Obama kept a promise but took a risk in boldly declaring an end to 7½ years of war in Iraq and asserting that America had turned the page on the costly, divisive conflict. In relatively brief but politically freighted remarks from the Oval Office on Tuesday night, Obama lavished praise on America’s military men and women, saying they had “stared into the darkest of human creations—war—and helped the Iraqi people seek the light of peace.” CAMPAIGN PROMISE FULFILLED—President Barack Obama greet members of the military and their families on the tarmac at Biggs Army Airfield in Texas, Aug. 31. Obama’s second address to the nation shifted quickly, however, to politics, with a reminder of his erstwhile opposition to the deeply unpopular war, a position that—in part—fueled his successful run for the White House.

National

This Week in Black History

For the Week of Sept. 9-15 September 9 1739—The so-called Stono, South Carolina slave revolt begins. It was led by a slave from Angola named Jemmy. The group gathered near the Stono River about 20 miles from Charleston and began a march and insurrection, which resulted in the deaths of at least 25 Whites. Marching under a banner proclaiming “Liberty,” it took a couple of hundred armed Whites to put down the revolt.