Daily Archive: June 8, 2010

Metro

Speak Out: What is your opinion on how promoters run hip-hop events in the city?

Given the failure of several hip-hop events by local promoters, we asked Pittsburgher their opinion. Here’s what you said. “I don’t think it’s necessarily a failure on the promoters’ behalf. I do believe that it’s a combination of communication on some promoters ends at ‘over promising and under delivering’ in conjunction with artists that oftentimes face the wall of uncontrolled scenarios that are out of their hands.” Emmai AlaquivaEmmy award winner, entrepreneurShadyside Emmai Alaquiva, Orlando Marshall, Nadia Souls

Metro

Community Calendar

Career fair JUNE 9—The Career & Workforce Development Center will host its 20th Annual Community Career Fair from 10 a.m.-3 p.m. at the Homewood-Brushton YMCA, 7140 Bennett St., Homewood. Over 30 employers, training and service providers will be in attendance looking for qualified candidates. For more information, email Carena M. Phillips at p.carena@yahoo.com.

International

Malawi gay couple keep low profile after pardon

by Raphael Tenthani BLANTYRE, Malawi (AP)—A gay couple from Malawi have kept out of the public eye after being pardoned and freed from prison, in what a relative said May 30 was a deliberate decision prompted by the conservative view of homosexuality in the southern African country. SENTENCED—Tiwonge Chimbalanga, right, and Steven Monjeza, left back, are led from court in Blantyre, Malawi, May 20, after a judge sentenced the couple to the maximum 14 years in prison for unnatural acts and gross indecency under Malawi’s anti-gay legislation. Tiwonge Chimbalanga and Steven Monjeza were released May 29, hours after President Bingu wa Mutharika pardoned them without condition. But in giving his pardon, which he said was on “humanitarian grounds only,” Mutharika warned that homosexuality remains illegal in the conservative southern African country.

International

Castro claims Obama lives in fantasy world

HAVANA (AP)—Fidel Castro speculated June 2 that a nuclear strike on Iran might help President Barack Obama win a second term in the White House and also suggested the United States could attack North Korea. The former leader of Cuba, who has not been seen in public for nearly four years, also portrayed the U.S. president as a victim of fantasies planted in his mind by sinister advisers. The column published by Cuban state media floated the idea that a nuclear attack on Iran—perhaps even without U.S. authorization—might help Obama win re-election in 2012.

National

Detroit hit man pleads guilty to 8 murders

by Ed WhiteAssociated Press Writer DETROIT (AP)—A self-described hit man who once told police “I kill people for money” pleaded guilty to eight murders, including the contract killing of a Detroit police officer’s wife. Vincent Smothers pleaded guilty to eight counts of second-degree murder and a gun charge in exchange for a minimum sentence of 52 years in prison. With credit for time served since his arrest, he could be freed when he’s about 80 years old. DEAL REACHED —In this April 21, 2008 photo, Vincent Smothers, 27, attends his arraignment in 36th District Court in Detroit.

National

40 years after 1st win, Rangel runs again

by Karen MatthewsAssociated Press Writer NEW YORK (AP)—A defiant Rep. Charles Rangel brushed aside questions about an ongoing ethics investigation June 6 as he announced his re-election campaign for the seat he has held since 1971. “They can fire their best shot, but they just can’t walk over success, right?” Rangel told cheering supporters at Boricua College in Manhattan’s Washington Heights neighborhood. MAKING ANNOUNCEMENT—U.S. Rep. Charles Rangel, D-N.Y., at the podium, smiles as Gov. David Paterson, second from right, and others join him during an event where Rangel announced his campaign for re-election to the 15th Congressional District June 6, in New York.

National

SC police: Black man shot to death, body dragged

by Susanne M. SchaferAssociated Press Writer NEWBERRY, S.C. (AP)—Two men who worked at a South Carolina poultry processing plant had spent most of the day together June 1, hanging out late into the evening, maybe rehashing their long shifts. By the next morning, one of the men—who was Black—was dead, shot to death and then dragged behind a pickup truck for more than 10 miles down a country road. The other—a White man—was in jail, charged with murder, and authorities were investigating the death as a possible hate crime. ARRESTED—This undated booking photo provided by the Newberry Sheriff’s Office in South Carolina, shows Gregory Collins.

National

Tennessee may honor Isaac Hayes with section of I-40

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (AP)—Legendary late soul musician Isaac Hayes may get a commemorative stretch of highway in his home state of Tennessee. ISAAC HAYES A measure to designate a section of Interstate 40 the “Isaac Hayes Memorial Highway” passed the state Senate unanimously June 3. The House approved it without opposition in April. The commemorative stretch would be near Memphis, where Hayes had a home until he died of a stroke in 2008 at the age of 65. He was raised in Tipton County, north of Memphis.

National

Jackson’s hometown moves ahead with plans for museum

by Karen Hawkins GARY, Ind. (AP)—Michael Jackson’s father and Gary officials announced plans June 2 to move ahead with a long-delayed performing arts center to help revitalize the late singer’s hometown, drawing cautious optimism from residents who say they’ve heard this song many times before. MICHAEL ­JACKSON Work on the $300 million museum and performing arts center could begin as early as next year, said Gary Mayor Rudy Clay, acknowledging this isn’t the first time city officials have made promises about the project. Jackson left Gary as a child and visited just once, in June 2003, to announce plans for the center.

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National

This Week in Black History

Week of June 11-17 June 11 1963—President John F. Kennedy declares during a nationwide radio and television address that segregation was “morally wrong” and told the U.S. Congress it was “time to act” (pass legislation) to end all segregation of the races. That statement and similar ones endeared Kennedy to millions of African-Americans. However, a few months after making the declaration, Kennedy was assassinated in Dallas, Texas. But most of his legislative ideas would be implemented by his successor, President Lyndon B. Johnson. ALABAMA GOV. GEORGE WALLACE 1963—Displaying the tenacity of the segregationist mentality dominant in the South in the 1960s, Alabama Gov. George Wallace, with the aid of state troopers, stood in the doorway of the University of Alabama to block two Black students from integrating the school. But when the Deputy U.S. Attorney General returned later in the day with a force of National Guardsmen, Wallace stepped aside and Vivian Malone and James Hood were allowed to register.