Daily Archive: March 24, 2010

National

This Week in Black History

Week of March 26-April 1March 261831—The founder of the AME Church, Richard Allen, dies at age 71 in Philadelphia, Pa. As its first bishop, Allen set the African Methodist Episcopal Church on the path to becoming the first Black religious denomination in America to be fully independent of White control. He, in effect, chartered a separate religious identity for African-Americans. He also founded schools throughout the nation to teach Blacks. This includes Allen University in Columbia, S.C. MARIAH CAREY, JESSE OWENS, MARVIN GAYE

National

Police: Boy, 16, made racial comment at N.J. Walmart

by Bruce ShipkowskiAssociated Press Writer WASHINGTON TOWNSHIP, N.J. (AP)—A 16-year-old boy who police said made an announcement at Walmart ordering all Black people in a southern New Jersey store to leave was charged with harassment and bias intimidation, authorities said March 22. The boy, whose name is not being released because he is a juvenile, grabbed one of the courtesy phones at Walmart’s Washington Township store last Sunday evening and calmly announced: “Attention, Walmart customers: All Black people, leave the store now,” police said.

National

Radio personality threatened after Farrakhan appearance

by Brian E. MuhammadFor New Pittsburgh Courier (NNPA)—Syndicated radio talk show host Warren Ballentine recently got an increase in threats for his on air interview with the Hon. Minister Louis Farrakhan, leader of the Nation of Islam. Ballentine, who is also an attorney, interviewed the outspoken leader March 2 on a daily mid-morning radio show after he delivered his annual Saviour’s Day address Feb. 28, in Chicago.

georgecurrybox

Opinion

March madness on Capitol Hill

(NNPA)—March Madness, the frantic round of tournament showdowns to determine which team will emerge as the top college basketball unit in the nation, has nothing on the Capitol Hill madness that occurred over the weekend. Outside the domed deliberations over health care Saturday, so-called Tea Party protesters shouted the n-word at several African-American congressmen, including John Lewis who was brutally beaten in Selma, Ala. as part of the Selma to Montgomery March that led to the passage of the 1965 Voting Rights Act. Another Black representative, Emanuel Cleaver II of Kansas City, Mo., was spat on by one protester, who was arrested by Capitol Hill police.

Opinion

Amid the economic mess, new Black candidates arise

(NNPA)—Yes, and that is a very blessed thing. The Old Guard seems to be moving slower than ever and the “Party Loyalists” are clamoring for fresh ideas—ideas that they are not receiving from their leadership. The economy is in the tank and all they are concerned with on Capitol Hill is health care. We had better get involved in business development, deficit reduction, lower costs and taxation. Those are the only things that are going to get us out of our predicament. History will show that as this country teetered on the brink of financial ruin all they could do is hammer out some futuristic health care plan that makes no sense and will solve nothing. It is kind of like Nero playing his violin while Rome burned.

jasonjohnsonbox

Opinion

Justice Thomas, your wife is on the docket

(REAL TIMES MEDIA)—Everyone would like to believe that even if your boss’ wife doesn’t like you that it won’t affect your performance evaluation. We also want to believe that if our best friend’s husband owns a struggling Ford dealership that she won’t be mad when we drive up in a new Hyundai. But deep down, we all know this is not the case. The bonds between husbands and wives will always affect how these men and women behave in their public lives. That is why I’m perfectly comfortable with suggesting that Clarence Thomas remove himself from several Supreme Court cases in the coming term.

Opinion

Fighting childhood obesity

(NNPA)—When first lady Michelle Obama decided to launch the “Let’s Move” campaign to fight childhood obesity, she brought much needed attention to a crisis facing millions of children. It’s a special concern for children of color because new research shows Black and Hispanic children are disproportionally at risk for nearly a dozen factors that increase their chances to be obese. But children of color are far from the only ones in danger. Experts estimate one-third of American children are currently overweight or obese, and these rates have tripled among children ages 12 to 19 since 1980. Some adults may see a heavy child as a sign of a healthy eater, or think that for children, extra weight is mainly just a cosmetic issue. But serious risks for overweight children go far beyond appearance.

Opinion

There will be blood

I’m not crazy about congressional Democrats right now. As I write this, congressional Democrats are engaged in a furious partisan battle to pass their idea of health care reform. Alas, it is an idea the majority of Americans do not share. It is in fact an idea that the majority of congressmen do not share, which is why President Obama and House Speaker Nancy Pelosi are twisting arms, bribing, cajoling and threatening all manner of mischief in order to eke out a majority vote—or non-vote—on a bill the people have made clear they do not want. They may succeed.

Opinion

Go beyond high school

The percentage of high school students who went on to college or trade school within a year of finishing high school climbed from 47 percent in 1973 to 67 percent in 2007. That’s good news; our students are falling behind other industrialized nations in terms of graduation rates and we must play catch up. The bad news is that many young people, gifted in their own ways, don’t feel college is for them simply because they don’t thrive in the classroom.

Opinion

National Urban League and CBC call for ‘jobs surge’

(NNPA)—This week, the National Urban League will join the Congressional Black Caucus in a “jobs surge” hearing on Capitol Hill to listen directly to some of the more than 15 million Americans, a disproportionate number of whom are African-American and Hispanic, who are struggling to survive in the wake of the worst economic crisis since the Great Depression.