Daily Archive: February 17, 2010

Frederick Douglass

National

This Week in Black History

The Week of Feb. 19-25: February 19 FREDERICK DOUGLASS 1919—The “first” Pan African Congress is held, bringing together prominent Blacks from throughout the world to chart a program for Black unity and betterment. African-American scholar and activist W.E.B. DuBois was the chief organizer. The gathering was held in Paris, France, and drew 57 distinguished delegates including 16 from the United States, 14 from Africa and others from the Caribbean, South America and Europe. [The 1919 Congress is considered by many the “first” but another such Congress had been organized in 1900.]

National

Controversial Atlanta billboards link abortion, race

by Errin Haines ATLANTA (AP)—The message on dozens of billboards across Atlanta is provocative: Black children are an “endangered species.” The eyebrow-raising ads featuring a young Black child are an effort by the anti-abortion movement to use race to rally support within the Black community. The reaction from Black leaders has been mixed, but the “Too Many Aborted” campaign, which so far is unique to only Georgia, is drawing support from other anti-abortion groups across the country. RACE-BASED STRATEGY —This this Feb. 11 photo shows an anti-abortion billboard in Atlanta. The eyebrow-raising ads featuring a young Black child are an effort by the anti-abortion movement to use race to rally support within the Black community.

National

Civil rights icon released from Atlanta hospital

ATLANTA (AP)—Civil Rights icon Joseph Lowery has been released from an Atlanta hospital after two weeks. An Emory University Hospital spokesman said Sunday Rev. Lowery was released Saturday night. The 88-year-old Lowery was admitted to the hospital two weeks earlier with a blood clot in his lung. Rev. Joseph Lowery

National

Black leaders finally meet with Obama on jobs

by Pharoh MartinFor New Pittsburgh Courier WASHINGTON (NNPA)—Civil rights leaders met with President Barack Obama last week to discuss the president’s jobs strategy and to voice their concerns about the disproportionate effect of the jobs crisis on the African-American community. Even while the federal government was officially shut down due to the severe snowstorm that was incapacitating the Washington, D.C. area, the president still welcomed Rev. Al Sharpton, NAACP President Benjamin Jealous and National Urban League President Marc Morial into the Oval Office for their first formal meeting since Obama became the country’s first Black president.

National

Barack Obama’s proclamation on Black History Month

In the centuries since African-Americans first arrived on our shores, they have known the bitterness of slavery and oppression, the hope of progress, and the triumph of the American Dream. African-American history is an essential thread of the American narrative that traces our nation’s enduring struggle to perfect itself. Each February, we recognize African American History Month as a moment to reflect upon how far we have come as a Nation, and what challenges remain.

National

Former Va. governor among latest Obama critics

by Dorothy RowleyFor New Pittsburgh Courier WASHINGTON (NNPA)—Former Virginia Gov. L. Douglas Wilder has offered harsh criticism on the Obama White House, saying that if the president is to fulfill his dream of effecting change for America, he has to up the ante on his leadership skills—and fire some of his key players. Wilder is a Democrat and the first African-American to be elected governor of a U.S. state. He also once aspired to lead the nation as a 1992 presidential hopeful.

Opinion

Guest Editorial…Lost in translation

by Shannon Williams Since I try to educate, support and pay homage to the Black community in everything that I do, the month of February for me, is just like the other 11 months of the year. Nonetheless, I certainly appreciate Black History Month and all that it represents for our people as well as the general population. With that said, it’s important for us to not only reflect on our history, but also our present state of being. In doing so, I was reminded of how far we’ve come as a people and unfortunately, how far behind we are.

hopkendrickbox

Opinion

Five motivating factors for becoming a police officer

This week’s column is the result of the tremendous number of letters to the editors that were generally written by police, former police, police union officials, and by those who truly believe that the police can’t do anything wrong. There are even Blacks who have blinders on that have impaired them to the extent they believe the police are always correct. All these letters have been generated because of the publicity generated around the attack of the Black honor student in Homewood.

Opinion

Black leaders in White House, what happened?

(NNPA)—Recently, Dorothy Height of the National Congress of Negro Women, Rev. Al Sharpton of the National Action Network, Ben Jealous of the NAACP, and Marc Morial of the National Urban League, wrote President Barack Obama asking for a meeting about the state of Black employment and with the ensuing invitation, all but Height went to the White House in a snowstorm for a one hour meeting. The clearest version of what happened was stated by Marc Morial: “We worked very hard to share with him ideas around the need for targeted relief—and that means urban communities, to areas of high employment” so, as Ben Jealous said, the focus of the talk was more on place than race.

Opinion

The Palin mystique

(NNPA)—I thought we had seen it all after a Trenton, N.J. sixth- grader had to teach the Vice President of the United States, Dan Quayle, that potato is not spelled with an “e” on the end. But then we had eight years of Dubya and his malapropisms. Now we have Sarah Palin, no, not elected yet, but waiting in the wings. Someone said, “Get all the fools on your side, and you can be elected to anything.” The more I watch politics, the more that statement rings true. To even think for a minute that this country could actually have a president named Sarah Palin causes me to get my passport in order.