Daily Archive: October 8, 2009

International

Top Africa cardinal: next pope could be Black

VATICAN CITY (AP)—A prominent African cardinal says there’s no reason why the next pope can’t be Black. Cardinal Peter Kodwo Appiah Turkson of Ghana is playing an important part in a three-week meeting at the Vatican on the role of the Catholic Church in Africa. WHY NOT?—In this April 13, 2005 file photo, Cardinal Peter Kodwo Appiah Turkson of Ghana attends a mass for Pope John Paul II in St. Peter’s Basilica at the Vatican. Cardinal Turkson said Oct. 5, at a news conference at the Vatican that there’s no reason why the next pope can’t be Black.

International

Pope: materialism, extremism harm Africa’s future

by Nicole Winfied VATICAN CITY (AP)—Pope Benedict XVI opened a special meeting of clerics about Africa on Oct. 4 by praising the continent as a font of spirituality but lamenting that it is afflicted by materialism and religious fundamentalism. A Congolese choir—with bongo drums, electric guitars and swaying, ululating singers—filled St. Peter’s Basilica with African hymns as Benedict formally opened the synod, a three-week gathering of some 300 prelates to discuss the church’s problems in Africa. OPENING MASS—Bishops enter St. Peter’s Basilica at the Vatican, Oct. 4, to attend a mass celebrated by Pope Benedict XVI for the opening of the synod on Africa, a three-week gathering of some 300 prelates to discuss the church’s problems on the continent.

National

Ex-judge accused of trading sex for leniency

by Phillip Rawls MONTGOMERY, Ala. (AP)—Herman Thomas had an enviable political record as a Black Democrat elected and re-elected in a county overwhelmingly White and increasingly Republican. The respected circuit judge once was the Democratic Party’s choice to be the first Black federal judge in south Alabama. Then his career collapsed under allegations that he brought inmates to his office and spanked them with a paddle. Later, an indictment accused him of sexually abusing male inmates in exchange for leniency. The trial on charges of sodomy, kidnapping, sex abuse, extortion, assault and ethics violations was set to start Oct. 5. HERMAN THOMAS

National

Jackson, Farrakhan attend beaten Ill. teen’s funeral

by Caryn Rousseau CHICAGO (AP)—The funeral of a Chicago teen who was beaten to death on his way home from school drew civil rights leader Rev. Jesse Jackson and Nation of Islam Minister Louis Farrakhan on Oct. 3, both calling for an end to youth violence. CHARGED—19-year-old Silvonus Shannon, left, 18-year-old Eugene Riley, and 18-year-old Eugene Bailey, have been charged with first degree murder in the fatal beating of 16-year-old Derrion Albert Sept. 24, in Chicago. Prosecutors say 16-year-old Eric Carson, not shown, has also been charged with first degree murder in Albert’s death. Farrakhan said he came to the funeral because he was “deeply pained” by the death of 16-year-old honor roll student Derrion Albert. The boy was walking to a bus stop after school when a group of teens attacked him during a street fight late last month.

National

This Week in Black History

Week of October 8 to October 14October 81775—Slaves and free Blacks are officially barred by the Council of Officers from joining the Continental Army to help fight for American independence from England. Nevertheless, a significant number of Blacks had already become involved in the fight and would distinguish themselves in battle. Additional Blacks were barred out of fear, especially in the South, that they would demand freedom for themselves if White America became free from Britain.

Opinion

Guest editorial…If kids simply don’t feel safe, what do we do?

I don’t know what part of the video sickened me most. There was the exultation voiced by the one young…I can’t call him a man because he isn’t of age and he demonstrated no evidence of manhood…punk, who threw a punch at a boy who had been hit across the head by a railroad tie. There was the boastful bleating of another punk, who screamed aloud, “Put that n—–r to sleep!” I’ll hear that in my head for a long time…or at least until the next savage murder of a young person on the streets of Chicago.

Opinion

It’s time to be brutally honest about the ACORN debacle

(NNPA)—It was the 1960s, and after decades following the abolishment of slavery, African-Americans were still vying for simple fundamental human rights, including the most basic form of involvement in society—voting. Routinely disenfranchised from the process via underhanded tactics such as literacy tests, and more blatant intimidation methods like outright murder and violence, the Black community found itself intricately excluded from actively participating in any discourse that may have altered their lives for the better. Following the murder of voting-rights activists in places like Mississippi and Alabama, the president and Congress finally passed the Voting Rights Act of 1965 that aimed to ensure equality in our election process.

hopkendrickbox

Opinion

Deserving tribute to Donald S. Carter

The question to many of you is Who is Donald S. Carter? Carter was a deputy director at the Small Business Administration who died, but his sense of commitment still lives on. Don also is one of the unbelievable numbers of people across this nation who are not household names, but did an incredible job in making it possible for Blacks, Whites, women and all minorities to have a share in the American Dream of being successful entrepreneurs. Don was the kind of person who never saw his role as a job, but a mission and he would go above and beyond to help a business succeed and hopefully grow to a larger business. Don had been bypassed by the system when the director position became vacant and it was natural that he was disappointed, but it never affected his deep commitment to helping those who needed his expertise.

georgecurrybox

Opinion

Troubling HIV/AIDS stats for Black women

(NNPA)—Of all of the statistics about the disproportionate number of HIV cases in Black America, few are as perplexing as those about African-American women. Although Black women represent only 12 percent of the U.S. female population, they represent 61 percent of all new HIV infections among women—a rate nearly 15 times that of White women—and 66 percent of AIDS cases among women. An astounding 83 percent of Black women were infected through heterosexual activity, according to figures compiled by the Centers for Disease Control in Atlanta.

Opinion

Shooting deaths of children rose for second straight year

(NNPA)—I’m deeply disturbed that after a decade of decline, the number of firearm deaths among children and youths has increased for the second year in a row. Our 2009 Protect Children, Not Guns report released in September reveals that almost nine children and teens die from gunfire every day—one child death every two hours and 45 minutes. The report, based on the most recent data from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, states that 3,184 children and teens died from gunfire in 2006, a six percent increase over 2005, a total of 17,451 were victims of non-fatal firearms injuries, a seven percent increase from the previous year. When people from other industrialized democracies learn of America’s child gunshot death rates, they’re equally troubled.